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  • #301276
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    @Attiucus

    Yes, strong helmet indeed. But don’t you think this gives further impetus for developing closed cockpits?

    #301116
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    @Craig Woollard

    And why don’t you like widening the cars?

    @PorscheF1

    I believe the future lies in closed cockpits. If cars must get faster then driver protection should improve – either helmets become much safer and probably heavier too, or introduce well researched closed cockpit designs. And Van Overbeeke’s designs show that they won’t necessarily resemble sports prototypes…

    #300819
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    Here’s the link:

    #299254
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    @Simtek

    Really appreciate your response.

    I think F1 can never place too much emphasis on overtaking. Overtaking IS racing. It goes back to the basic principle of what “racing” means – lining up to complete the course ahead of the others. In other words when we go to a race we want to see how the grid shakes up after the race is over – how can the grid shake up unless there is no overtaking?

    Shaking up the grid through pit-stops is, in my opinion, not pure racing. Pit-stops were introduced at a time when cars did not carry enough fuel to complete a race, and tyres could not be made to last for long. But now we have fuel to complete a race, and tyres can also be made to last a whole race – so why have an external element like a pitstop determine the outcome of a race when the action should happen out on the course? If pit-stop strategies determine who wins or loses the race, the whole Mercedes-Benz AMG team should have stood with Nico Rosberg on the top step at Monaco.

    If team staff members with laptops decide who comes to the pits and when, and this in turn decides the race result, where is true racing? And what are the drivers racing for? That’s why I felt pitstops should be eliminated – it isn’t true racing. So if pitstops are eliminated, where does the action take place – on the track? How? Through overtaking.

    Overtaking is the soul of racing and it never can be overemphasized. And, as you said, it isn’t the kind of overtaking the DRS offers. That’s why my points idea would reward both overtaking and defending. That said, I don’t think my points idea is not gonna make overtaking so common that people get bored of it. It would only make overtaking more frequent than it is now. This combined with a lack of need for tyre preservation would give thrilling, flat out, unadulterated racing sans the tedium, particularly when the race duration is also shortened…

    @OmarR-Pepper – Vettel 40 victories!!!

    Appreciate your suggestion – seems a lot less radical. However I don’t think one point for the most position-improving driver would make much of a difference.

    #299219
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    @Iestyn Davies

    Yes, points system would have to transform to the kind you’ve suggested so that ultimately the top three do come out of the race with the greatest points haul. And since the objective of this points-for-overtaking-and-defence system is to make racing more exciting and driving more flat out, I think fastest lap should also be awarded with points but not pole position.

    The definition for an “advance” would have to be fine tuned. I just suggested the basic principle which I think is more or less ok because it wouldn’t result in too many points being awarded.

    @Mark

    The incentive to overtake may be there but it isn’t strong enough. In spite of the DRS we still have processions rather than races. Something needs to break the tedium.

    @Giggsy11

    The introduction of the higher rear wing and DRS was to make the design of the cars more conducive for overtaking. But it simply hasn’t happened. If an 18th place driver overtakes the 17th place guy, it makes no difference to the overall points tally for him or the team. But if he overtakes in this system he gets a point, and if the 17th place guy defends he gets half a point too. So it can’t be ignored that the motivation and incentive is greater with this points-for-overtaking-and-defence system.

    #299208
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    I appreciate all your responses – of course there are things to fine tune in this.

    @minnis

    Good point you made, but overtaking would not be happening every now and then. And it’s only one point for an overtake. The points for a win must be raised so that the possibility for the winner grabbing lesser points than some of those behind him is reduced. Besides, the leader can still accumulate points by defending.

    @John H

    That’s really a possibility – there probably would need to be some rule enforced which says that once a successful overtaking has been made by driver B on driver A and then driver A on driver B or vice versa, the same two cannot be eligible for points for subsequent successful overtakings on each other except at a later stage in the race, at least 10 laps later.

    #289690
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    @Rodney That depends on what you exactly define by “settling into”. Alonso was a long time Renault driver even before his second spell with the team. He joined the team as test driver in 2002 and then raced from 2003 to 2006 – four years as a driver plus one as test driver. That seems reasonable enough to me. Five years with Ferrari (2010 to 2014) also seems long enough to me, for a driver who is keen on winning and adding to his title tally.

    Staying on and on with a team isn’t necessarily a plus point for a competitive driver. If Schumacher, Vettel or Hamilton have stayed long with some teams it is probably because, either things were good or they had the belief that things would get better. When they knew or felt it wouldn’t they left their respective squads.

    Ayrton Senna never “settled in” based on your definition – one year with Toleman, three years with Lotus and six years with McLaren (that too the last year was spent grudgingly) before the fateful Williams spell. Alain Prost, Nigel Mansell and Nelson Piquet are all examples.

    #289482
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    Hearty thanks to @Prof Kirk (a professor indeed) for that exhaustive list. I acknowledge my forgetfulness of many key aspects, particularly that of Button and Vettel’s pre-Red Bull years.

    Thanks also to @JamieFranklinF1 for dusting the cobwebs about Button’s vast pre-McLaren experience.

    #289196
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    @Sri Harsha

    Yeah, how silly of me to forget Vettel’s Toro Rosso and BMW Sauber years. Just overlooked them. So Vettel has race winning experience with Ferrari and Renault engines. Thanks for reminding mate.

    #263528
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    @Roald, thanks for that information. I got to learn something new :)

    #263377
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    Thanks for the information @andae23. 1970 was when most of the grid switched to the full face helmets, but since the picture from 1970 shows him in an open face helmet he could have been the last one to change…

    #201818
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GeHZ5rJfnh4&feature=related

    Another brilliant Robin Gibb number!

    #201817
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgLpMFklwHs&feature=related

    One of my favourite Robin Gibb and Bee Gees masterclass performances.

    #201816
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    Robin, your voice will always be ringing in our ears

    #201815
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    That’s absolutely true, F1Yankee. I’ve watched their 1997 comeback tour video again and again. Listening to it just make your mind light. It’s a strange feeling of nostalgia and aesthetic pleasure. There are few things that attract me apart from following motor racing, and the Bee Gees are certainly one of them.

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