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  • #212810
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    snakebite
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    @raymondu999 I’m not actually talking about the game to be honest, because as I stated earlier I haven’t played it enough to know about the setups and effects of switching the brake bias. I was talking about real life and that one of the reasons for moving the brake bias rearwards, would be to use trail braking.

    No need to worry about being too harsh – at least I learnt something new. The thing is that I have heard it from various sources. What I meant by without ABS was actually an experiment where a car arrived at a point at the same speed and the driver just hit the brakes as hard as possible. With ABS disabled and all four wheels locked the car stopped earlier than with the ABS engaged. Maybe it was some combination of tyres, road surface, weather conditions and possibly the qulity of given ABS system that lead to this particular result. I think that it is just a common misconception then.

    As a side note on ice for an emergency situation without ABS it is safest to hit the brakes as hard as possible, because locking some of your wheels will send you into a spin while locking all four you lose control but you move in a generally straight line and have the ability to regain control by letting go of the brakes and pressing the clutch.

    #212808
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    snakebite
    Member

    @raymondu999 I’m not going to argue any further about braking with locked tyres vs rotating tyres, since you obviously have a better understanding of it. I have seen experiments of the same car stopping quicker without ABS, but after a brief google search I can see, that you were right.

    As for the brake bias I am under the impression, that F1 cars generally have the brake bias forward and the simplified settings in the game would mean front – bias even more towards the front and rear – bias less towars the front. At least thats what I presumed when I said rear bias would be better for trail braking.

    #212804
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    snakebite
    Member

    I haven’t played F1 2012 nearly enough to answer the original question. But I have some different views on the basic theory compared to some earlier replys.

    First of all a rotating wheel doesn’t actually slow you down quicker. A rotating wheels enables you to control the vehicle.

    About trail braking I believe rear bias is better. Because it is easier to lock your front tires when turning in you would have to ease off the brake. That would mean the rear brakes are not at their limit anymore when using front bias. Rear bias would better allow braking on the limit while turning in. At least that makes sense to me.

    #204213
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    snakebite
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    @Guilherme I’m sorry if that’s old news for you, but just in case it isn’t I would suggest not spending your time on designing nuts and bolts etc. because there are various databases where you can download detailed standard parts.

    Also there are some websites that house different third party 3d models. for instance http://grabcad.com You should check them out. If not for using some pieces on your project then maybe for some inspiration on how to desing your own.

    Great to see so frequent updates. Hope you keep up the progress when you get to some more challenging components.

    #204208
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    snakebite
    Member

    It’s my first post here. As a mechanical designer my daily work is CAD design so I’d like to think I am quite proficient in CAD and especially in 3d modelling. Since I just recently received my master’s degree I have almost exclusively trained using 3d solid CAD systems.

    I didn’t pay too much attention to this thread in the beginning, because modelling an F1 car in Autocad seemed as easy as brushing your teeth through your a**hole. It’s definately a good idea to switch to Inventor. I haven’t actually used Inventor, but I use Solidworks quite extensively and from what I’ve heard they are very similar. I have a couple of tips I would like to share (maybe you already figured them out by yourself or heard them from somewhere else):
    -Always attach dimensions to all lines curves etc. so it would be easier to modify them later. What I mean is don’t just draw a line and insert the correct length, but always add a dimension to the line so you can easily change it later.
    -Use as few dimensions to define a shape. If possible add relations to parts of sketches instead of duplicate dimensions. It will make later modifications a lot easier. Also use patterns instead of replicating the same element
    -Figure out a logical structure of parts and sub-assemblies in advane. Figure out how much of a piece is useful to model as a single part and which parts are easier to mange as sub-assemblies.
    -Mate parts in a way that makes later modifications easier. For example if two parts have holes that should line up you should use the “concentric” mate instead of other ways of positioning the parts. This will enable you to change the hole location on one part without having to modify mates in the assembly (the pieces will move according to the hole position)

    Good luck, it’s a very interesting project and I’ll be keeping an eye on it. Feel free to ask if you have any questions and I’ll try to help.

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