Statement by Nelson Piquet Jnr on his Singapore crash leaked online

Nelson Piquet Jnr claims Flavio Briatore ordered him to crash at Singapore

Nelson Piquet Jnr claims Flavio Briatore ordered him to crash at Singapore

Nelson Piquet Jnr’s statement to the FIA about his controversial crash during the Singapore Grand Prix last year have appeared online.

F1SA has published the documents which are reproduced in full below.

Piquet’s statement includes the following remarks:

At the time of this conversation I was in a very fragile and emotional state of mind. This state of mind was brought about by very intense stress due to the fact that Mr Briatore had refused to inform me of whether or not my driver’s contract would be renewed for the next racing year (2009) as is customarily the case in the middle of the year (around July or August). [...]

After the meeting with Mr Symonds and Mr Briatore, Mr Symonds took me aside to a quiet corner and, using a map, pointed me to the exact corner of the track where I should crash. This corner was selected because the specific location of the track did not have any cranes that would allow a damaged car to be swiftly lifted off the track, nor did it have any side entrances to the track, which would allow a Safety Marshall to quickly move the damaged car away from the track. Therefore, it was felt that a crash in this specific position would be nearly certain to cause an obstruction on the track which would thus necessitate the deployment of a safety car in order for the track to be cleared and ensure the safe continuation of the race.

Mr Symonds also told me which exact lap to cause the incident upon, so that a strategy could be devised for my team mate Mr Fernando Alonso. [...]

During these discussions, no mention was made of any concerns with respect to the security implications of this strategy, either for myself, the public or other drivers. The only comment made in this context was one by Mr Pat Symonds who warned me to ‘be acreful, which I took to mean that I should not injure myself.

I intentionally caused the crash by letting go of control of the car just before the relevant corner. In order to make sure I would cause the incident during the correct lap, I asked my team several times via the radio to confirm the lap number, which I would not normally do.

After the FIA officially announced its investigation Renault declared it would not comment on the matter before the hearing on Monday 21st September. Will Renault stick by that and allow Piquet’s damaging claims to go unanswered?

Source: FISA via Tazio.com.br and F1 Around

Renault Singapore crash controversy

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367 comments on Statement by Nelson Piquet Jnr on his Singapore crash leaked online

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  1. That’s kind of incriminating. It isn’t looking good for Renault. I’d HATE that Fernando only won because of NPJ crashing. I also hope he isn’t involved in this AT ALL.

    Sept 21st can’t come soon enough for me.

    Do you think it’s all true, Keith? I don’t think I’ve seen your opinion on it.

    • Well, this being true or not he DID come into the position to win thanks to the safety car Piquet jr. caused…

      • Were you replying to Fernando winning because of the crash or the Fernando involved part?

        I assume it was the second – while he would be involved (by winning, obviously) he wouldn’t have KNOWN that’s why he won. That’s what I meant. I hope FA didn’t know NPJ was told to crash!

        • I was replying to ”only won because of NPJ crashing”.

          • Oh, OK lol. Again, though, my point above covers that, too. Fernando was involved because he won but that doesn’t mean he was in the know. I pray he wasn’t in the know!!

          • I never said that he won ONLY because of Piquet’s crash. It helped a great deal as his race strategy was based around safety car directly after his first pit-stop.

            Thank God that stupid rule got scraped by the way…

          • Yeah, Renault took a huge gamble – if they did – crashing NPJ when Fernando might not have even won.

          • sato113 said on 10th September 2009, 21:23

            IF the crash was a plan and IF Alonso knew about this plan, then I think even more shame should go on Alonso’s shoulders than his bosses as he is meant to be the famous, double world champ, sporting, fair, racing driver. who people look up to.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 10th September 2009, 19:37

      Leah – I gave my opinion on it in this piece: Did Piquet crash on purpose? (Poll)

      Until we see some evidence it’s still too much for me to believe (a) that Renault would do something like this, (b) they left some kind of incriminating evidence and (c) Piquet was able to crash an F1 car on purpose more convincingly than Michael Schumacher did at Monte-Carlo in 2006.

      What is interesting is this is still Piquet’s word against theres – they haven’t, apparently, left any documentary evidence – which you would expect if they were going to do something like this. I still have a hard time believing it’s all true though. Piquet’s got nothing to lose.

      • Sorry, didn’t see that!

        I think this statement adds a bit more to the whole thing but still doesn’t 100% prove anything.

        Still worried for Renault, it isn’t exactly looking like Nelson Piquet Jr just made it up for revenge.

      • Shagrathian said on 10th September 2009, 20:00

        I still have a hard time believing it’s all true though. Piquet’s got nothing to lose

        I’m not with you this, Ketih. He’s young and has a promising career in front of him, despite his unsuccessfully results with Renault.

        • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 10th September 2009, 20:16

          Do you think any F1 team will take him after this?

          • I think he will be lucky if he gets to keep his superlicence after this, his whistle-blowing could grant him some slack though…

            The real question is – can they punish Renault based on this statement?

          • If he was a good driver then yes!

            But really, he’s actually done no worse than Hamilton at Melbounre in some respects, as he’s going along with what the employer wants him to say/do.

            Personally though, I think we would all like to think we’d tell Pat and Flavio where to go if they asked to do such a thing!

          • Did any team took Alonso after prensenting his Emails to FIA and blaming McLaren for Spygate while he was driving for them?

          • Bigbadderboom said on 10th September 2009, 20:34

            Whats incriminating about the statement for me is if this is being fabricated by Piquet then why doesn’t he just go the whole hog and say he was promised a 2009 seat for his troubles.
            It’s effectiveness is in it’s plausability, although Piquets admitted effecting the outcome of the race, he has some sympathy in so much as it’s “The big bad wolf Flavio” V’s “Bullied little Piquet” But although we all know its not that simple, that will be a lot of peoples perception, Flavio has done himself no favours in being so one-sided in his driver management that Piquets statement rings true. Personally I think Flavio and Pat are guilty at some level, but proving it will be very difficult, if they prevent a case of blackmail, and can convince the FIA/WMSC that this is an orchestrated effort by Piquet snr/jnr to extract some revenge on Flavio then it may be difficult to prove wrong doing either way and Piquet Jnr may end up carrying the can, as he has admitted crashing the car delibrately.

          • Nope. Regardless of the outcome of the hearing this is a severely career limiting move.

          • Yes, daddy will buy him an f1 team

          • Shagrathian said on 10th September 2009, 23:21

            Maybe this is his last shot. Probably after his bad result with Renault, any team will take him as well. I don’t know. I’m just trying to make some empathy.

          • Patrickl said on 11th September 2009, 8:57

            @Keith,

            I still have a hard time believing it’s all true though. Piquet’s got nothing to lose

            Do you think any F1 team will take him after this?

            So Piquet actually DID have something to lose by coming out with his confession?

        • Bartholomew said on 10th September 2009, 20:30

          Piquet Jnr. has made a HUGE mistake by saying these things. He should have just kept his mouth shut. Out of resentment at being fired in 2009 because of being a poor driver, now he talks about something that went on in 2008.
          I dont think any team will want him. Unless his daddy funds his career out of his own pocket, he is finished.
          No team or sponsor will want their name associated with such a loser.

          • I would say it’s quite brave of him to be honest.

            He could have easily kept his mouth shut. Instead he’s standing up to that horrible man Flavio.

            I like it.

          • Agreed Bartholomew. @ John H., he is only standing up to Flavio after being fired. If he had real balls and was truly brave, he would have stood up to Flavio by not crashing his car.

    • A report submitted ahead of the FIA’s World Motor Sport Council hearing into the matter, which takes place in Paris on September 21, confirms that Alonso “knew nothing of the alleged plan to cause a deliberate crash.”

      You can red the full report here:

      http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/78451

      • S Hughes said on 10th September 2009, 22:56

        No surprise there – just as I thought. If there’s no concrete evidence, they will just be taking Alonso’s word for it, and Symonds/Briatore probably wouldn’t want to ruin his career by implicating him. But really, if you believe that you believe anything!

        • Agileracer said on 11th September 2009, 5:25

          A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.

          That Churchill quote comes to mind when I see your rabid comments against anything remotely related to Alonso and anything against Hamilton.

    • Indeed Alonso has participated in these types of underhanded tactics to gain advantage before or have we forgotten the Mclaren Hamilton incident? It would not surprise me that he did in fact have working knowledge of the plans set forth by Flavio & Symonds for NPJ crash…

  2. Interesting. Thanks for posting!

  3. and now it hits the fan…

  4. Won’t piquet get a big sign for actually crashing on purpose and not saying this until renaut sacked him for being rubbish?

  5. mp4-19b said on 10th September 2009, 19:26

    Biggest ever scandal in motor sport history, Biggest since the watergate scandal. Nuff said!

  6. Unbelievable reading…

    Amazing to think that they didn’t need to go to all this effort to secure a win, when Alonso reached the top step of the podium in the following race in Fuji.

    Hindsight is a wonderful thing :-D

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 10th September 2009, 19:45

      Very true!

      • Antifia said on 10th September 2009, 22:02

        Keith, you seem to believe Alonso is on the side of angels in this one, but I wonder how it can be. I mean, this story about only believing it if someone can categoricaly prove it is a bit weak – What would you expect? A neat document trail left behind? On the circunstancial field, however, there is plenty to cast a doubt on Alonso’s aloofness. He started with a lightly fueled car, on the back of the grid, in a track were you have the same expectation of overtaking other cars as one would in Monaco. That would have been a downright stupid strategy – stuck in the back with low fuel? Nobody does that, let alone an experienced guy like Alonso.

        • S Hughes said on 10th September 2009, 23:02

          Exactly, and the article in the Official 2008 F1 Review book confirms that rival strategists thought that the strategy was crazy unless you knew that a crash would occur.

          • Yorricksfriend said on 11th September 2009, 8:37

            But its not implausible that he was gambling on a strategy like that working because it was very possible for someone to crash anyway, being such a bumpy and narrow street circuit. And running long will only get your a points paying position at best unless something insane happens.

          • But also, when you’re starting that far back, sometimes it’s better to try something different to everyone else.

            I very much doubt Alonso knew anything about this and he would have accepted the strategy.

        • sato113 said on 10th September 2009, 23:23

          If Alonso was in on this plan, then he will lose alot of respect from alot of people. and rightly so…

        • If it all comes out to be true, then I would find it hard to believe that Alonso wasn’t in on it.

      • Giant21 said on 11th September 2009, 2:37

        Yes that’s true but Alonso probably would have won if he started in the first rows, his car was very good that week.

        Really bad move by Piquet, one that wreaks of arrogance. His only chance of returning to F1 is through his daddy, who also had a big mouth but at least had the skills to match it.

        Sure, Alonso did get a seat in Renault (and will get one in Ferrari) after essentially blackmailing Ron Dennis, but there’s one difference between him and Piquet Jr.: He’s a double world champion!

  7. Fore sure, it doesn’t look good.

  8. S Hughes said on 10th September 2009, 19:29

    Shocking. I think it’s true, but whether the FIA find it so is another matter.

    • Joaqo (Max should resign now!!!) said on 10th September 2009, 19:31

      So true.

    • Bigbadderboom said on 10th September 2009, 20:37

      Here Here S Hughs, I fear for Piquet Jnr in this, his actions are the only ones proven at this time, and may well be the only ones proven by the end.

      • S Hughes said on 10th September 2009, 23:22

        I can understand Keith’s incredulity, but haven’t Renault basically admitted they planned the crash, and all they are doing now is quibbling over who thought it up?

        • sato113 said on 10th September 2009, 23:23

          yeah can’t believe they said that! idiots.

          • Bigbadderboom said on 10th September 2009, 23:55

            I think that Renault are trying to apportion blame to Nelson and seek compensation through the courts, it will be the lesser of scenarios for them, the fact will remain Nelson crashed on purpose, Flavio was in charge, so the best they can hope for is to prove slander against Nelson, and at least lessen the impact on their brand.

        • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 10th September 2009, 23:56

          Can you point to the bit where Renault admitted it was deliberate?

          • stillious said on 11th September 2009, 0:21

            No, they cannot.

          • S Hughes said on 11th September 2009, 1:11

            I thought I saw leaks to the effect that Symonds in one breath said that the crash wasn’t discussed and in another said that Piquet suggested it. See link: http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/78446

            Briatore is reported to have claimed that he was: “a victim of extortion by the Piquet family.

            “I confirm the meeting with Piquet on Sunday morning, but nothing like that was ever talked about. I also remember that Piquet at Singapore was in a very fragile state of mind. Besides that, there are the audio recordings where I express disappointment when I see on the screens that Piquet had crashed.”

            Symonds is also reported as saying: “It’s true, during the Sunday meeting with Piquet the issue of deliberately causing a SC deployment came up, but it was proposed by Piquet himself. It was just a conversation.”

  9. As much as I wouldn’t want to believe this is all true the pieces are fitting in and the leaks seem legit.

    • mp4-19b said on 10th September 2009, 19:35

      Could people go to jail if found guilty? I think even a private investigating agency “Quest” is involved in the investigations.

      • Mark Hitchcock said on 10th September 2009, 20:43

        From Joe Saward’s blog:

        “The really alarming thing is that these days fixing a race is beyond being a sporting matter. There could be other side-effects that people in F1 are not yet focussing on. In recent years F1 has become a sport that is increasingly followed by gamblers and that means that manipulating results can be considered to be fraudulent behaviour. Remember the furore that occurred a few years ago when there were orchestrated finishes at the Austrian and United States Grands Prix? Thus, there exists the possibility that there could be a criminal investigation as well.”

        http://joesaward.wordpress.com/2009/09/01/thoughts-about-singapore-2008/

        • Jonathan said on 11th September 2009, 16:02

          That never occurred to me before.

          Incidentally, was there ever a threat of criminal proceedings aimed at Ferrari in 2002?

  10. mp4-19b said on 10th September 2009, 19:32

    re posting from wrong thread:

    Confessions of a Dangerous Mind part 2!!! Never ever have i seen anything like this! This might be the biggest scandal of all time !! Ooh this has to be the mother of all scandals. This will be spoken for years to come. Everything pales into insignificance before this!!OMG, we are all f up!! What a sham. Even Mario Puzo couldn’t have written this script. Its a thriller letter, Dan Brown must bend his head in shame !!

  11. adz2193 said on 10th September 2009, 19:32

    If this is true then Alonso could be in trouble too. Alonso is one of the most tactical drivers on the grid so it’s hard to believe he didn’t question Symonds’ decision to fuel him for just 12 laps.
    What does everyone think?

    • S Hughes said on 10th September 2009, 19:36

      I agree, but he won’t get any blame because he is like Teflon man. He is connected to all kinds of ****, but ends up smelling of roses.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 10th September 2009, 19:46

      There’s nothing in this that implicates Alonso, though.

      • mp4-19b said on 10th September 2009, 19:51

        C’mon Keith we all know Alonso.

        • “C’mon Keith we all know Alonso”

          No you don’t know Alonso. You are all simply prejudiced against him, nothing at all has implicated him in this. Nelsinho makes it pretty clear the aleged conspiracy was between Flav Symonds and himself. Not even his engineers were in on it nvm Alonso who need never have known.

          As we’ve been saying for weeks the 12 lap strategy was unusual, but entirely plausable as a high risk high reward strategy to try and salvage something from the weekend. The strategy is in no way evidence of a conspiracy, nor would it have aroused Fernando’s suspicions.

          • Antifia said on 10th September 2009, 22:19

            yeah, why would it? You are just in 15th place, in a Monaco style track, heavy fueled cars in front and behind you…starting with 12 laps of fuel seems great!

          • sato113 said on 10th September 2009, 23:28

            but I still see Alonso as the kind of guy who would hear this plan and just let it go ahead without any argument.

          • S Hughes said on 10th September 2009, 23:33

            It wasn’t plausible at all (see F1 2008 Review book article I’ve posted many times).

          • Jonathan said on 11th September 2009, 16:08

            I had originally thought that Alonso had 12 laps of fuel carried over from Q3… until I remembered he had started 15th and therefore not participated in Q3. His strategy was odd. Very odd, and he is clever enough to have known that.

            It’s not exactly a mark against his name, just a question mark.

      • adz2193 said on 10th September 2009, 20:01

        But surely, when Fernando was told he was pitting on lap 12, he must have found it strange. So either, Symonds said something like “It’s a gamble on an early safety car” which is still a ridiculous strategy, or told Alonso the full truth. Like I said, Alonso has a bigger say on the race strategy than most other drivers on the grid.

        • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 10th September 2009, 20:06

          Renault have tried these ultra-aggressive strategies on other occasions, though – at Spain last year, for example, and at Hungary this year when he was 13kg lighter than anyone else on the grid.

          • Bigbadderboom said on 10th September 2009, 20:40

            But Pat Symonds was heard on a radio call telling other race engineers not to worry it will be alright when they questioned the strategy, surely Alonso would have as well, the Alonso/Flavio relationship is almost incestial, I can’t believe that he wasn’t at least aware.

          • adz2193 said on 10th September 2009, 21:33

            Not starting from 15th on the grid at a street circuit though! =/

          • sato113 said on 10th September 2009, 23:30

            yeah, i agree adz2193. Spain 08 he was 2nd on grid, and Hungary 09 he was 1st. not 15th on a street track keith!

          • stillious said on 11th September 2009, 0:28

            They have indeed, Keith. I can’t get my head around why gambling a strategy on safety cars on a tight street circuit is bizzare. Surely it’s a better gamble than a huge fuel load which may gain you a couple of places at best. I think the phrase is “**** or bust”. (apologies for any intentional circumvention of wordfilters).

          • Jonathan said on 11th September 2009, 16:14

            Reanult fuelled Alonso light in Q3 at Spain and Hungary in order to secure a good grid spot. The fuel loads were then frozen.

            At Singapore he never participated in Q3, starting 15th.

        • Jonathan said on 11th September 2009, 16:13

          Remember fuelling light is not just gambling on an early safety car – it is gambling on a safety car coming out between your early pitstop and the time other drivers have to pit.

          So it’s an idiotic gamble… unless you can control when the safety car will come out.

    • Its not the first time Alonso has been fueled light. Lets not also forget that Alonso despite his extreme views has a level of fairness about him. In my opinion Alonso didn’t need to know about it, as he would always push, so telling him about this would just have distracted him from driving his best.

      • HounslowBusGarage said on 10th September 2009, 20:18

        I agree Oliver, but surely Alonso’s stomach must have turned over when he learned that Piquet had crashed on such a very opportune lap. As was proved when he was at MacLaren, Alonso is not reticent about involving the authorities – or at least threatening to – so if he had any suspicions, perhaps he should have spoken to the FIA at the time. The fact that he didn’t speak up must count against him in the FIA investigation.
        In the transcript, it says that Piquest asked the pit “to confirm the lap number, which I would not normally do.” Does the FIA keep radio traffic tapes or transcripts nearly a year after the event?

        • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 10th September 2009, 20:25

          If you were doing something like this, you would want the minimum number of people knowing about it – that way it’s less likely to get out.

          Presuming this is true, Alonso didn’t need to know the details of the plan, so why tell him? It’s one more person who could give the game away.

          As you point out, given his track record, he’s not necessarily someone you want to have in possession of your secrets.

          • 100% spot on Keith I think.

            I’m not exactly the biggest Alonso fan, but I think he’s innocent here. I feel a bit sorry for him actually.

          • Jonathan said on 11th September 2009, 16:18

            Yes, I’m guessing Alonso is probably innocent and deserves the benefit of doubt.

            But… question marks will always remain. Did he suspect? If not, why not? If so, did anyone confirm his suspicions?

    • Nitpicker said on 10th September 2009, 20:14

      it’s hard to believe he didn’t question Symonds’ decision to fuel him for just 12 laps

      Wasn’t Alonso fuelled for a few laps longer, and brought in on lap 12 unexpectedly early?

      Teams sometimes bring drivers to pit a bit earlier, if they are catching up on backmarkers for example. Obviously on lap 12 this wouldn’t have been the case. I’m interested at what Renault’s explanation would be for this.

    • Bartholomew said on 10th September 2009, 20:33

      Alonso was very fast that whole weekend, and also won the following race in Fuji. Give him some credit.

      • mp4-19b said on 10th September 2009, 22:17

        I just cannot believe that alonso had no prior knowledge of this. He’s trying to wash his hands off. He did this to Ron, now he’s doing this to Flav. i’m sure he will do the same to Stefano.

        • he better be careful with the italians, he might find himself with a whole different car than the others. ferrari has destroyed drivers as well as made them.

    • Given Alonso’s proven (but unpunished) guilt in the McLaren spy case, I wouldn’t put it past him.

      • Jay Menon said on 11th September 2009, 1:26

        If this is true, which very well could be, whats all the fuss about? Isn’t this akin to diving for a penalty in football?

        While both are extremely unsportsmanlike, the latter is pretty common you have to say. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is the so called best player in the world has scored a healthy number of goals from penalty and free kicks that we won diving…and the whole world is still awestruck by him.

        So whats the difference? Football managers have been known to tell their player to go down if they can to win a penalty in difficult games. There is no difference here. Renault had the pace that weekend, and if it wasn’t for Alonso’s brake failure in qualy, they would have been up the grid.

        So…the saw an opportunity..told Nelsinho to take a dive..thats all..the won the penalty…and scored.

        I’m not condoning this one bit..I hate divers. We know that simulation is illegal in football..is it illegal in F1?

        • Imagine nobody had dived in football for 30 years, and then someone dives and wins the match for it. Then you have a beautiful thing destroyed, and are a sad and shocked fan.
          In football we are well past that point, but for F1, this would be a completely new (and easy to repeat!) cheating trick. By the same token, once we are ready to crash on purpose, one can as well take the first three rows out of a race at the first corner.

  12. For some reason I believe that they told him to. Although Symonds says that it was Piquet’s idea (http://en.f1-live.com/f1/en/headlines/news/detail/090910102106.shtml), I still think that in the world like F1 where business and money rules everything, they would go for it. Who knows, maybe Renault had warnings from their sponsors that if they didn’t achieve some certain goals they would lose their sponsorship.

  13. It all seems so neatly lined up.. Causing an accident which allowed Alonso to win and sign on for another season b/c there was improvement.

    While I am not a huge Alonso fan I really hope he knew nothing about this whole said incident.

    On a side note, with all of the live telemetry and radio feeds, why do teams insist of playing the silly games? Eventually the truth comes out, especially with the amount of data that is collected by the teams and FIA.

    • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 10th September 2009, 19:48

      why do teams insist of playing the silly games? Eventually the truth comes out

      If this is indeed the truth. And you have to wonder if there are other similar stories that never come out…

      • sato113 said on 10th September 2009, 23:38

        keith could you do an article on all the main conspiracies and arguments since 2000 or so? (team orders, michelin tyre accusations, renault j-damper, double diffusers etc….) perhaps trying to discuss their similarities and trends.

  14. Mussolini's Pet Cat said on 10th September 2009, 19:35

    What puzzles me, is that, if this is true, then why did Flav dump Piquet knowing that this would all come out?? Hasnt the ol’ playboy ever heard of ‘keep your friends close and your enemies even closer’???

    • S Hughes said on 10th September 2009, 19:39

      Arrogance can make one feel that they are untouchable. I know someone who knows him well, and I get the feeling he has supreme arrogance.

      • Agileracer said on 11th September 2009, 5:24

        A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.

        That Churchill quote comes to mind when I see your rabid comments against anything remotely related to Alonso and anything against Hamilton.

    • Random Chimp said on 10th September 2009, 19:41

      Perhaps he was banking on Piquet trying to get another drive?

    • Tiomkin said on 10th September 2009, 19:47

      Perhaps Flav thought nobody would take the accusations seriously.

    • I think Flavio was counting on Piquet not wanting his professional credibility ruined by this scandal – but after being laid off Piquet had nothing to lose and decided to drag Flavio and Renault down with him.

    • Well, he had to dump him sometime. Piquet couldn’t stay with the team forever. So this was the time. Just strange that they dumped him in the middle of the season. Could have at least waited till the end of it.

      • Antifia said on 10th September 2009, 22:12

        And given Grojean’s performance so far, it doesn’t seem Piquet Jr was doing such a bad job after all – the guy who drives the other car…the crappy one.

      • Mussolini's Pet Cat said on 11th September 2009, 1:30

        that’s my point, the timing is bizarre….

  15. Shagrathian said on 10th September 2009, 19:41

    Great share. Thank you, Keith.
    This is unbelievable! What a shame! I remember the support of Alonso to Felipe near to the end of the championship. Was it because of guilt? What a shame!

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