Montezemolo: Failure to compromise harmed FOTA

F1 Fanatic round-up

In the round-up: Ferrari’s Luca di Montezemolo says some FOTA teams were unwilling to compromise.

Links

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Twenty years in a game of bingo (Ferrari)

Luca di Montezemolo: “We have left FOTA of our own accord and without consulting anyone else, because we were tired of the compromises dragging it down [...] there were some who preferred to only think of their own interests.”

Ecclestone admits ??27m secret payments (Daily Telegraph)

“According to his own defence documents Mr Ecclestone sent secret payments via third parties in Switzerland in order to disguise their source.”

Nico Hulkenberg: ??I?ve learned in different ways??

“I?m back now, I want to establish myself, satisfy my team. As you say, your team mate is always the reference point. He?s very competitive, and in his second year he will also up his game a little bit, so it?s difficult to judge.”

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“We’ll finally have the KERS we didn’t have last year, and that’s a big help. I remember that when I didn’t have it, in Toyota, it was a problem that made the difference.”

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Comment of the day

Bookoi says F1 needs more than just an American driver to succeed in the USA:

I agree that it would be a major boost to have an American on the grid (and I think in Alexander Rossi, we soon will do), but I think its more a question of marketing the events and presenting them in a way that appeals to the market. There?s an existing F1 fan base over in the States that understands the sport as well as we do over here, but to the average motorsport fan I think F1 still appears elitist and closed off.

To be fair, that’s probably not far off the mark.

But if F1 goes over there with the same open, fan-friendly mentality of the domestic series and gets decent coverage, I?m sure it can become a success even without a home driver. Then when a home driver does arrive, BOOM. Off the scale.
Bookoi

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On this day in F1

John Cooper, who pioneered rear-engined F1 car design in the post-war era, died on this day in 2000.

He designed the first rear-engined car to win the world championship, in 1959, and all his rival constructors soon followed his lead.

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63 comments on Montezemolo: Failure to compromise harmed FOTA

  1. Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 24th December 2011, 0:09

    there were some who preferred to only think of their own interests

    This coming from the man who is president of the team that believe they are Formula 1 and that their departure from the sport would be a fatal blow to the sport’s credibility.

    Pull the other one, Luca.

    • Slr (@slr) said on 24th December 2011, 0:16

      Exactly what I thought.

      • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 24th December 2011, 0:24

        I had to laugh when I read this one the other day, where Luca claims that Ferrari sacrificed their advantage (by not pushing for the OTBD ban) for the good of the sport.

        Luca has been talking a lot these past few days, and he’s clearly trying to make out that Ferrari have been instrumental in protecting the integrity of Formula 1. The fact that this co-incides with his announcement that he will be standing in the Italian general elections in 2013 is merely coincidence.

        Yeah, right.

        • Julian (@julian) said on 24th December 2011, 1:05

          there were some who preferred to only think of their own interests

          So Ferrari left fota for the good of the teams and not for ferraris personal interests.
          What a joke.

          • Valentino (@valentino) said on 24th December 2011, 2:50

            Lets be honest here, Ferrari is not Formula One, but is a great chunk of it. You can take out, McLaren or RedBull or Lotus or Renault out of the sport and the sport would survive, but without Ferrari Formula One wouldn’t be Formula One. I am not saying that this is right but its the way it is. Taking out Ferrari from F1 would be like taking out the grass from Wimbledon. We are talking about decades of history and when talking about Ferrari people should kneel just a little bit lower. This is a team with fans all around the World, not just in a country. Ferrari is a synonymy for F1. I personally thing Luca di Montezemolo is arrogant, but he represents a team that was not run by timidity.

          • Mike (@mike) said on 24th December 2011, 3:37

            Which is true. But only in the world of fans.

            When it comes down to things like politics or economics. Ferrari is just another team.

          • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 24th December 2011, 4:10

            I personally thing Luca di Montezemolo is arrogant, but he represents a team that was not run by timidity.

            No, he represents a team that will force their vision of the sport onto everyone else given half a chance.

    • infy (@infy) said on 24th December 2011, 1:06

      Sad part is that what he says is true. While you might hate what he says, and feel it is arrogant of him or his team to say it, that does not make it any less true.

      It is ironic that when Ferrari says something it is thrown in the gutter as an instant lie, but when another team say it, it must be completely true.

      Your hatred for Ferrari has blurred your judgement.

      • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 24th December 2011, 1:19

        Actually, I just believe that actions speak louder than words. Ferrari can say they left because they were tired of others having their own agenda – but they have also threatened to leave the sport (and on more than one occasion) in an attempt to get their way with the sporting and tehcnical regulations because they believe the sport cannot survive without them and that they other teams (and the FIA) will be too afraid of that happening.

        So call me a cynic, but I’m not prepared to believe that Ferrari are championing the future of the sport.

        • Julian (@julian) said on 24th December 2011, 2:38

          Exacty, im a bit of a Ferrari fan myself and I can see that luca is piddling nonsense again.
          Luca has basically said that because the other teams were protecting their interests Ferrari are leaving fota to pursue their own interests.
          To me that reeks of hypocrisy and double standards.

          That’s why as a Ferrari fan I hope luca leaves Ferrari to further pursue his political career in Italy and someone less idiotic will take charge.

    • Toro Stevo (@toro-stevo) said on 24th December 2011, 1:29

      What’s that quote about sawdust in someone’s eye while there’s a plank in yours? I think that applies to Ferrari in general, but particularly Luca. I’m not surprised he’s running for government, but I won’t elaborate why for fear of breaking the house rules.

      Ferrari are frustrated because the balance of what they are allowed to spend on cars and testing are not in their favour. That’s the simple reason they left, they couldn’t get it their own way.

    • Wonderduck (@wonderduck) said on 24th December 2011, 8:37

      …there were some who preferred to only think of their own interests.

      To be fair, he IS correct. What he very carefully doesn’t say is that Ferrari is one of them.

    • Tifoso1989 (@tifoso1989) said on 24th December 2011, 11:36

      they are actually Formula 1

    • matt90 (@matt90) said on 24th December 2011, 15:04

      ‘were’ being the crucial word. Now Ferrari aren’t in FOTA the people only thinking of their own interests also seem to have left…

      I actually like to think that the quote is unfinished:
      “there were some who preferred to only think of their own interests… but because none of the other teams were as arrogant we decided to leave.”

    • UKFan (@) said on 25th December 2011, 9:24

      …………………………………………..Its not that much of a lie. is it? just joking.

  2. StephenH said on 24th December 2011, 0:20

    The sport would be better off without this pillock.

    Enough said.

  3. cmckinleyF1 (@cmckinleyf1) said on 24th December 2011, 0:35

    Strange how we get this constant speculation about Trulli’s future yet he seems determined to keep going

    Happy Christmas Keith and everyone at F1Fanatic :)

  4. HoHum (@hohum) said on 24th December 2011, 1:06

    I disagree With those criticising Luca diM. And agree wholeheartedly with his desire to be able to use F1 as a research tool to improve their road cars. It would be very easy to make exciting race cars using production V8 pushrod engines as Nascar and V8 supercars do in their fake sedans, but looking like F1 is the least important aspect of F1, technical development is what makes F1 different and great.

    • HoHum (@hohum) said on 24th December 2011, 1:09

      AND SEASONS GREETINGS ALL.

    • Mike (@mike) said on 24th December 2011, 2:50

      Hang on, didn’t the limitations placed on them at Silverstone help Ferrari significantly?
      Didn’t Alonso win that race? On pace?

      • Mike (@mike) said on 24th December 2011, 2:53

        again… meant to be a new post.

        Since I’m here however, I think Luca is using the road car technology line, not genuinely. I suspect it’s being used for arguments sake as he doesn’t like the new rules that were/are coming in.

        I hope everyone haves a lovely Christmas :D

      • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 24th December 2011, 4:07

        Hang on, didn’t the limitations placed on them at Silverstone help Ferrari significantly?
        Didn’t Alonso win that race? On pace?

        Yes, but those limitations were lifted because of the bonkers way that the FIA implemented them. Luca is saying that they didn’t insist on keeping the OTBD ban, and that they did it for the good of the sport.

        • The rules were reverted after the FIA realised it benefited the wrong team.

          Why else would they suddenly revert? It helped the wrong team, where as it was meant to help mclaren. Ferrari could have protested but they backed down in the interest of the sport. They did not want to bring the sport into disrepute.

  5. wasiF1 (@wasif1) said on 24th December 2011, 2:05

    I share my birthday celebration with Andrew, Richpea, and Willian Ceolin. Cheers to all & wishing them a very Happy Birthday.

  6. Nutritional (@nutritional) said on 24th December 2011, 9:39

    Montezemolo must be the biggest hypocrite in F1 right now. Why can’t Fiat put someone else in charge of Ferrari?

    • Tifoso1989 (@tifoso1989) said on 24th December 2011, 12:27

      he’s not doing something special he’s just looking after his team’s interest but i don’t understand on what hypocrisy are you talking about he was very clear “We have left FOTA of our own accord and without consulting anyone else, because we were tired of the compromises dragging it down”
      In Silverstone it was clear that Ferrari gained an advantage that doesn’t mean that they will win the WDC but it was obvious that the Mclaren’s were struggling imagine if Ferrari didn’t agree on changing the rule maybe they will be second in WCC and that’s exactly what Luca wanted to say
      “hypocrite” is not a proper word to describe the most successful manager in Formula 1 who will celebrate 40 years in Ferrari in 2013

      • Nutritional (@nutritional) said on 25th December 2011, 13:17

        The exact problem is that he only looking out for the best interests of his team, but he’s trying to make himself look like a hero because he’s leaving behind FOTA because he claims it’s full of teams who are only interested in self-preservation. That is the definition of hypocrisy. Ferrari enjoyed it’s most successful years between 1997-2006 when Montezemolo took a back seat and let Jean Todt, Ross Brawn, Rory Byrne and Michael Schumacher run the show. Suddenly he decides he needs to interfere in 2006, Schumacher is suddenly forced to retire, Ross Brawn leaves, and the team barely get the 2007 driver’s title, win the 2007 constructors trophy by default, and lose the 2008 drivers title by 1 point, when, had they kept Ross Brawn and Michael Schumacher, whom were far more experienced than the Hamilton/McLaren pairing at winning championships in the grooved tires era, may have easily won it all in 2007 and 2008. The team was nowhere in 2009, they fire an race engineer because he made the honest mistake of thinking they were racing Webber and not Vettel at Abu Dhabi in 2010 and, to that point, had helped them to 10 podiums with Alonso, and then “part ways” with Aldo Costa because, shock and awe, he can’t keep his car up with the Red Bull which is theclass of the field over every team, and has rumors spreading around about Stefano Domenicali future, simply because he’s afraid of the Italian media. He even publically discusses his dissatisfaction with Felipe Massa’s performance, rather than taking the honorable stance of team solidarity and saying “we ask all our team members, drivers included, to strive for their best in the performance or their duties” or “Felipe is having techincal issues with the setup of the car which we are striving to work to understand” and making decision about Massa’s come contract expiration behind closed doors and announcing a decision then. From my understanding he was only directly involved with the Scuderia from 1973-4, and by 1975 he was head of all Fiat racing, by 1977 was manager of Fiat and not directly involved in racing at all by then and in 1991 was made chairman or Ferrari where he spent most of his time patching up the road car situation until around 2006. 1975 was the first year Ferrari won the driver’s championship since 1964, and it was won by Montezemolo hiring Lauda and Lombardi, letting them run show, like from Todt and company from 1997-2006, not from meddling in Scuderia affairs. He is not the name to be the face of Scuderia Ferrari. Whenever he opens his mouth, the Scuderia “horse whisperer” has to rephrase everything he says, because everything he saying is ridiculous and inflammatory.

        • Tifoso1989 (@tifoso1989) said on 25th December 2011, 23:37

          ” Ferrari enjoyed it’s most successful years between 1997-2006 when Montezemolo took a back seat and let Jean Todt, Ross Brawn, Rory Byrne and Michael Schumacher run the show”
          Luca was the man that took the gamble & recruited Jean Todt (First non Italian manager to be at the head of Ferrari ) who did the grate job of rebuilding the team & Todt was not the best manager at that time like Ron Dennis he hasn’t any experience in Formula 1
          “and it was won by Montezemolo hiring Lauda and Lombardi, letting them run show like from Todt and company from 1997-2006, not from meddling in Scuderia affairs”
          did you expect Luca to run the show & driving instead of Lauda or making race strategy instead of Brawn just to convince you that he was involved in the scuderia affairs loooooooool
          it seems that you’re contradicting yourself by saying that Luca was not involve in the success of Ferrari & he’s the responsible for hiring the best names in the Business & letting them run the show
          from my understanding also it seems that you took a look at Luca’s career in wikipedia but you forgot to mention that he was Enzo Ferrari’s assistant when he was just 26 years old

  7. rdpunk (@rdpunk) said on 24th December 2011, 9:51

    Ferrari have been getting on my nerves for a few years now. They just complain about nearly everything from FOTA to the exhaust gasses everything. It’s about time they stop sucking their thumbs and nursing there wounds and start to become a forefront of F1 again. They can hide behind the “Ferrari’s history means we can do anything we want” but looking in History for too long means that the future is compromised. It’s about time they stop crying over spilt milk and become team that wins and every team wants to beat, not a team that is going more and more downhill.

  8. Mike (@mike) said on 24th December 2011, 9:59

    This is going to be pretty controversial. I hope Luca does leave Ferrari to do the Italian Politics gig, I think the sooner Dominicalli is in charge, the sooner Ferrari can get on the right track.

    • Prisoner Monkeys (@prisoner-monkeys) said on 24th December 2011, 10:15

      @mike – I think Ferrari just need to start being Ferrari again. They got too comfortable at the front, and started behaving as if they alone had the right to be there; everybody else had to earn the privelige. Then they started holding the sport hostage, demanding changes and getting their own little technical veto of the rules (which has thankfully been stripped from them) and basically acted like spoiled children. If they developed a car like the Red Bull BR7, they would expect everyone to be happy that they were dominating the sport.

      • Bleeps_and_Tweaks (@bleeps_and_tweaks) said on 24th December 2011, 11:54

        @PrisonerMonkeys – I def agree with the last part. If the F150 had pioneered the OTBD and subsequently run at the front of the field like the RB7, they would be lauding in their own ingenuity. Because they didn’t, and weren’t able to adapt the F150 to utilise it very well, it had to go! Also just by coincidence with Ferrari choosing not to exploit the OTBD it was for “the good of the sport”. Ahem.

      • Tifoso1989 (@tifoso1989) said on 24th December 2011, 13:29

        i agree with you Ferrari just need to start being Ferrari again
        and Stefano Domenicaly is doing a grate job in rebuilding the team & betting a lot on the chassis reinforcement of some departments but the rules are quite strange & affected them very badly
        the ban of testing :it’s like the ban of training for a football team ferrari used to have an entire team of testing
        the ban of engine development(most important part in an F1 car):Ferrari alongside mercedes are the best in building engines
        so demanding change by ferrari is the normal thing to do:

        • Agreed. Banning practice is just stupid. They should allow more practising so teams and drivers can improve. The current setup prevents teams from improving once the season begins.

      • DASMAN (@dasman) said on 24th December 2011, 17:52

        @pm

        You need to pull your head out mate.

        You forget when Ferrari were running at the front in the Schumi years and they had the power of veto over the new rules designed to stop Ferrari being dominant. They chose not to veto the rule changes.

        Get some perspective.

      • AndrewTanner (@andrewtanner) said on 25th December 2011, 18:06

        @prisoner-monkeys @mike The guy is a complete moron. Domenicali must shake his head every time he opens his mouth.

  9. Faisal Iqbal Roxna said on 24th December 2011, 12:54

    Where did you saw this that this blog has been vetoed best blog in the world?

  10. verstappen (@verstappen) said on 24th December 2011, 15:13

    Tha ones who pay, are not used to suffer

    Old man Trulli probably has à point there. Then again, how many dads do you know who could pay even for à go-kart, let alone à complete race car…

    • Faisal Iqbal Roxna said on 24th December 2011, 15:19

      I want to go kart, but no track in my town. I have go to Lahore or Karachi. I like very much F1 but I am alone in my town who watch F1. I ask around 1000 people if they watches F1 & around 900 don’t even know what f1 is :(

      I am very much good in F1 knowledge. I memorize all world champion from 1950 onwards 7 I remember all podium finisher from 2001 in memory.

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