Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium – spectators’ experiences

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Tell us about your experiences of visiting Spa-Francorchamps in Belgium.

You may wish to include:

  • When you visited the track
  • Where you watched from
  • How easy it was to get to
  • How much of the track you could see
  • What support races there were
  • What you liked and didn’t like
  • How much it cost and whether it was good value

Please use the reply box below to leave your comments.

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839 comments on Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium – spectators’ experiences

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  1. Spa 2005 – Wet and wonderful!

    For the first time in a good few years, I was finally tempted to abandon the comfort of watching the Grand Prix in the pub for a trip to that thing called Europe, for a race visit. Actually, it was the current wife who decided to do this. Thinking, that as I had reached the milestone of the 40th birthday, and that my biological clock was now beginning to wind down, it was thought appropriate that should go back again to the heaven and hell that is Spa before I die. I hadn’t been to the Belgian Grand Prix since 1994 so maybe it was time for a return visit.
    She, who must be obeyed, also decided that if we were going to go to a Grand Prix, (in a country who’s average daily rainfall would put a rainforest to shame), that it should be done with a more than a hint of luxury. All I had to do was arrange the ferry crossing and she would take care of the rest. Booking the ferry, was really a mistake to leave to me. I always confuse the word ‘luxury’ with the word ‘economy’ so my choice of Norfolk Lines (‘the truckers ferry’) did not go down very well. She could not complain about the price (£44 return) but stepping out of the Porsche in all her finery, onto something that resembled a cargo ship with lots of randy Dutch truck drivers was not what she had hoped for.
    After a few hours of relative silence on the drive from Dunkirk to Belgium, we reached our hotel, the Hostellerie Lafarque, a haven of all that is exquisite (and expensive). This absolutely beautiful hotel is only seven miles from Spa, it could happily look after the Ecclestone’s of this world, it even has its own helicopter pad, but the fact that Belgiums premier (for that, read ‘one and only’), sporting event was happening on its doorstep appeared to have escaped them. The place is almost empty. As we check into our room, it is a case of, do we explore the vast expanse of living space allocated to us or do we hit the bar. No prizes for guessing which option we chose.
    On Saturday, while my wife went into Liege for a bit of personal time with her credit card, I went to the circuit for qualifying. I stopped on the way to indulge in that most pleasant aspects of Belgian life – Frites and Mayonnaise, at a roadside café. It should be written in law that anybody visiting Belgium does this but for me it is essential. Last nights dinner at our hotel was mouth-wateringingly georgous but the portions were not enough to feed a supermodel and the meal took forever to arrive – I’ve seen quicker glaciers than our two waiters, so my 1 euro chip stop was a welcome one.
    Arriving at the Francorchamps circuit immediately reminds me why I love this stupid sport. I’m a bit late, and as I walk through the woods to my grandstand, the warm up has already started. First, I hear the totally, way over the top noise, of an F1 car obliterate the leafy silence and then I catch a quick glimpse of a Toyota as it exits La Source and rockets at a truly mental speed down the hill towards Eau Rouge. Hairs standing up on the back of the neck don’t come into it. I’ve been to Monaco, Silverstone, Barcelona and others, but nothing, just nothing beats watching an F1 car is the morning mist at Spa.
    Watching the ‘one by one’ qualifying format on TV is dull enough, but at the circuit it is obviously a bit better, but the race is what we are here for and when we arrive on Sunday the atmosphere is electric. It is also absolutely throwing it down with rain. The wife is not at all impressed. Thankfully, we have a pre-booked lunch at a fantastic restaurant near the circuit gates called ‘Le Roannay’. The meal is by no means cheap at about £100 per head but it is truly superb. Our host, Michel, is well into the spirit of the day and despite the frightening cost, the meal beats a Silverstone hamburger any day. This is our alternative of doing the ‘Paddock Club’ and it works a treat. We did consider selling both of our children for medical research to fund a couple of ‘PC’ passes but lunch at Le Roannay and a couple of Gold 3 grandstand tickets at a third of the cost was the preferred option – and we got to keep the kids.
    The race – well you know what happened, Kimi won, somebody else came second, Montoya crashed again – whatever, the result was almost secondary to the whole experience. It may have been wet, cold, expensive and full of drunk Germans but if you do nothing else before you shuffle off this mortal coil then you must visit Spa – and just don’t forget to try the frites and mayonnaise..

    Rob Sinfield also writes for http://www.GrandPrixDiary.com and http://www.itv-f1.com

  2. The return of the “modified” Spa-Francorchamps to the F1 calendar in the mid-1980’s meant I could finally visit the track that had captured my imagination years earlier in the film Grand Prix. I decided to make it my very first race off the North American continent. I was not disappointed. My flight over cost only $99 US on People Express-they were like Sir Freddy Laker’s airline-and a general admission ticket worked out to about $27 US-and looked just like a bus ticket!
    By the time I made it to the track Friday from Brussels, Lauda had already injured himself in a crash and was out for the weekend. This left only Prost to represent McLaren. But the man to watch this weekend would be Senna in the black and Gold Lotus-especially if the weather was tricky.
    There seemed to be plenty of time on Saturday to watch the cars from different corners, compare driving styles, and just take in the breathtaking and historic views from around the track. Naturally the La Source hairpin is the first view you get of the track on arrival. But there is also the dramatic vista from the top of the hill at Rivage, looking down the mountain to the pits complex at the bottom-one of the best scenes in all of racing, in my view.(You are actually looking down on the helicopters ferrying the drivers to and from the track!)
    Great to watch the turbos, especially Piquet in the BMW, come down the hill to Pouhon and blast thru the turn, right in front of you. Also unforgettable is standing at the base of the Eau Rouge/Radillon complex-which looks like a towering tidal wave of asphalt looming up over you.
    During the break in one of the days, I took my hire car around the old original track-which at that time still featured tiny white guardrails and imposing telephone towers right at the edge of the fairly narrow roadway. You could get a true sense of how imposing Spa was-Stavelot-the town and famous turn-seems very far away from Start/Finish. All of this is outstanding motor racing history and not to be missed.
    To my delight, it was pouring rain race morning. Had a tasty coffee, bought an umbrella, and headed for the top of the hill to Rivage, where there was a small bar with a big, lively crowd. Watched DeAngelis slide straight off the wet turn during warm up. Naturally the star of the show turned out to be Senna, who managed the wet/dry conditions in an exceptional manner to win. A Lotus winning at Spa was fine by me.
    At that time, the atmosphere was great, the crowd friendly, and the scenery beyond compare. You can keep your Tilke tracks-this one is an original.

  3. val Whitelock said on 22nd September 2007, 12:38

    Giggling as i read Robs account of Spa above. We on the other hand did it on a budget. Booked the tickets & ferry in January, 3 day race tkts 105 euro’s, return ferry £100 for 6 of us -bargain. Left Dover at 7am and arrived at Spa (via beer & cig shops) just in time for 2nd practice on Friday. Sat in the same spot all weekend, on straight at top of Eau Rouge, blindin view of 2/3 of track, and smack bang in middle of giant tv screen. Had to get up at 6am Sunday morning to get our spot but was well worth it. You know the result, not as we’d hoped but the atmosphere is electic and the track itself awesome. Support races were Mini challenge, Porche’s and GP2.
    Couple of tips – camping at track was 80 euros for 2 nights, no water & no loos!! And extraordinarily noisy (germans partying all night long). Don’t book a ferry home any earlier than 11pm, motorway grid locked for 2 hours on return journey.
    Came home happy & tired and managed to do the full weekend, each for the price of a Silverstone ticket!!!

  4. Dank said on 18th March 2008, 10:07

    After years of watching F1 on the telly I finally made the effort to actually go see my favourite past-time in ‘the flesh’ in 2007 – and what better place to do it than at Spa-Francorchamps! I went for a package deal via Motor Racing International which included coach, ferry crossing and one nights stay in the Dutch town of Heerleen which was right next to the border of Belgium/Germany/Holland. Including the price for a bronze ticket (£125) the total amount was about £400 which I thought was quite reasonable. Getting there and back was a breeze.  I was there for both qualifying and race and each time sat at Pouhon turn which gives you a brilliant view on proceedings and lots of track time when the cars go past. It is quite a steep embankment so I would recommend investing in a mat or similar to get yourself comfortable. I would also advise getting there as early as possible as by 8am the place was packed. Thankfully the weather held out for all of the weekend so I didn’t get to see the ‘micro-climate’ I was pre-warned about! Unfortunately the race was a bit of a procession but that didn’t detract from what was an excellent weekend and one that I would thoroughly recommend people to visit. It’s worth the asking price just to watch the cars go from La Source up the gigantic Eau Rogue corner.

  5. Belugas said on 9th September 2008, 10:55

    Having booked our tickets some 11 months in advance with http://www.spafrancorchamps.be, it was well and truly worth the wait. What an exciting Grand Prix! Commisserations to Kimi indeed…

    Tips for future punters going to Spa:
    – Ticketing: Book in advance as there are good savings available (pre 31 October, 20%). We purchased tickets in the Gold 1 area and were very pleased with the view – ie. directly opposite Ferrari’s garage and the winners’ presentation area.
    – Seating: if you purchased tickets in the Gold 1 area, note that in some cases, you may not be seated next to each other as we found out when we arrived. In particular, Section E has their seats numbered, for example, E176 – E195, next row E196 – E215 and so on. However, seat E215 is behind seat E195 (and not seat E196 as one might reasonably expect). I’m not sure what can be done given the area was sold out, however, spafrancorchamps.be (through whome we bought our tickets) have been relatively good with emails. We have lodged a complaint.
    – Accommodation: we stayed in Liege and it was a good 35min drive to the circuit. This suited us fine – Liege is a reasonably sized town with good restaurants.
    – Driving to Spa: On qualifying and race day, you would be well advised to ARRIVE at the turnoff from the motorway to the circuit by 7.30-8am at the latest if you want to park in your preferred carpark. The Belgian police make no concessions – you go where you are directed. End of story. In some cases, you may have to walk a long way to get to your seats so if possible, get there in good time.
    – Parking: getting to the various carparks were relatively simple. However, exiting the carpark on race day was absolutely atrocious. It took us 1hr 45mins to make our way from the carpark to the motorway. This drive took no more than 10mins on the Friday (slightly longer on qualifying day).
    – F1 village: a great buzz there and fairly close to the circuit (although on the opposite side to the Grandstands).
    – Toilets cost 60cents this year – but facilities were very clean and well maintained. Well done to those working at the facilities!
    – Information on the circuit was quite difficult to find pre-race. However, the following website was useful: http://www.spa-francorchamps.be. You can also pre-book parking on this website (we did not).
    – Food: only very basic food options available – sausages, burgers, frites, waffles, drinks. Frites cost €5…as were sausages and burgers.

    All in all, a great experience and we hope this helps future F1 fans heading out to Spa! The live experience is priceless…

  6. Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 11th September 2008, 14:42

    I went to Spa to watch the Belgian Grand Prix in 2000 and stayed at a nearby camp site.

    The circuit is magnificent. My advice is to get a three-day ticket and spend Friday slowly walking around the track, watching the action from a variety of locations. Eau Rouge is obviously great but there’s a particularly spectacular vantage point above turn nine (“the corner with no name”). Pouhon and Fagnes are also great places to watch. Stavelot (which is now called Curva Paul Frere) is a bit hard to get to. When I went you could get to the inside of Blanchimont, but I’m not sure if that’s possible now.

    The weather is infamously inclement so take waterproofs with you (an umbrella won’t do if you want to stay dry all day).

    The local frites are fabulous and there’s loads of decent restaurants nearby. If you’re there a day or two early make sure you drive around the roads where the race was held when they used the long circuit which you can see here:

    http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/2008/01/05/f1-circuits-history-part-1-1950/

  7. Andy Kelly said on 23rd October 2008, 1:06

    Spa 2008 was my long awaited first Grand Prix & was definitely worth the wait!! Like many others we booked our weekend Bronze tickets through http://www.spa-francorchamps.be. giving us access to any Bronze section on the circuit for £150 so we had chance to sample several viewing areas before settling for our pre-planned option at the end of Blanchimont overlooking the Bus Stop Chicane, what a brilliant decision that turned out to be!!
    We had a fantastic view for Qualifying on the Saturday & with no viewing obstructions at all had a fantastic day, made extra special when we lit our portable barbecue & had a selection of Bacon & Sausage sandwiches to compliment our Belgian Beer bought from the local Supermarket in Stavelot. We are all big Mclaren Mercedes fans (especially Lewis) & the extra Sausages we had left over went some way to establishing cordial relations with the large number of Ferrari & BMW fans sharing our hill.
    Race day was equally exciting, the BBQ providing both breakfast & lunch this time but our view wasn’t as good as we got there quite late (08:00) to find the hill almost full, so we were relegated to further up in the trees. We still saw all the action at Bus Stop however, including THE incident of the race between Lewis & Kimi!!
    As for the accommodation I towed my caravan from the UK via the Hull/ Zeebrugge ferry & stayed on a British organised campsite about 2 miles outside of Stavelot at Somagne . This was basically just a farm field but had a marquee (with bar & live band “Performance” who were brilliant) & portable toilet/ shower facilities. We paid around £90 each for 3 nights & this included coach transfer to & from the circuit on the Saturday & Sunday. I have to say that the organisers http://www.campingf1.com/index.html did a fantastic job with all facilities being excellent & we will definitely be using the same site again next year.
    All in all we had a memorable weekend, the travelling was fun, the F1 experience unbeatable, the campsite enjoyable, all for a total cost of around £600 including spending money. We are upgrading to Gold 8 seats for next year which will cost twice the money but will definitely be worth every penny for the guaranteed view, CAN’T WAIT!!

    • Johnny said on 13th January 2009, 15:42

      Hi,
      Great info on Grand Prix – thanks, I intend to take my caravan over for this year on 26th – 31st August. Do you have any tips on campsites ?

      Thanks

    • Andy Kelly said on 13th January 2009, 18:44

      In response to Jonny’s question.
      As already mentioned, we stayed at a temporary site outside Stavelot last year. It was really good & I would probably go there again if I can’t find better (the website for this company is in my previous comment). It is quite lively & there were admittedly a couple of small scuffles during the evening entertainment, one because some French guys arrived late & had missed dinner & another because some young Aussies upset an English guy but it I suppose it could be put down to all of that testosterone flying round!!
      The site is a sloping farm field too so with the rain over the weekend (which is almost certain) it became a quagmire so if (like a lot of others) you don’t have a good quality 4X4 it will be a struggle to leave the site after the event.
      I have to admit that another problem is that it is about 7 miles from the site to the circuit, there are coach transfers to & from but you have to get up really early (especially on Sunday) & no matter where you are there is a fair to long walk to the viewing areas. I wouldn’t reccomend driving as the traffic is quite busy.
      I am looking to stay in Francorchamps this time & think I have found a site right in the town itself (http://www.francorchamps-camping.com/) but the website is not brilliant & mostly in German. I am going to try ringing them soon to see if I can get more details.
      As for travelling, I live in Yorkshire so travelled via Hull which is very expensive (£150 per person)& is quite time consuming. This time we are going to go via Dover to Calais as it’s a lot cheaper, less time at sea & the actual distance travelled is quite similar.
      Hope this helps & if you need any further info please ask. Maybe we could meet up during the weekend (we are a group of mid 40’s male’s by the way).
      Andy

    • Tung Nguyen said on 26th August 2010, 11:29

      Thanks for the tip and information. I will sit right at the end of Blanchimont where I can see the Chicane. And I will be there at 7am to get a good seat!!!

      Go Lewis!!

      August 2010

  8. went in 2007 and got a seat in Gold 3 which is at the top of eau rouge. unfortunately the stands seating is too shallow and unless you are in the 1st 2 or three rows you tend to lose sight of the cars as the reach the bottoms of the hill and you can only catch a glimpse of the cars as they race up past the stand. so i would give this stand a miss and try gold 4 which had a much better view plus it is cheaper.

    • Lewis said on 9th February 2009, 16:31

      JAYB,
      I will go for the Gold 3 this year (2009), do you think the upper part of the tribune should be great too? No fence in sight, more wide view?

      Best regards,

      Lewis, from Portugal

  9. Andy Kelly said on 22nd December 2008, 14:54

    Interseting comments from jayb with regard to the poor views in Gold 3, has anyone been in Gold 8 as I’m a bit worried now?

  10. Thomas said on 17th January 2009, 18:12

    Hey,

    I just would ask one question, is the “official” F1 Gp Camping (just next to the track) a good place to stay during the 3 days ? (I’m young so there’s no mistake about German fests and so on :) , but I mean in terms of infrastructures, localisation, track access, etc.)

    Thanks very much ;)

    Thomas

    • Andy Kelly said on 18th January 2009, 20:53

      Hi Thomas,
      can’t comment specifically on the circuit campsite as we weren’t on it but we could see it when we walked up through Blanchimont each day as it is on the other side of the track set up on a hill. It looked ok but from talking to other people at the circuit who were on there, it seems that it gets VERY noisy with all night parties etc. I was told that the toilet & shower facilities were not that good either but remember that this only second hand information so may not be completely true as people do exaggerate.
      There is a campsite called Eu Rouge which is situated half way along the road between Stavelot & the circuit entrance which looked ok from the outside & is half a mile walk if that to the entrance. They have a website but I can’t access it tonight to provide a link.
      Hope this helps.
      Andy

  11. Hugo Bourgeois said on 20th February 2009, 11:56

    I visited the 2008 ING Belgian Grand Prix as a co-invitee (my father was the one invited) from the CEO of ING. I watched the buildup to the Grand Prix from the pitlane and the race from just above that. I had some really nice views.

    The accessibility for the circuit is not too good, as it is located in the heart of the Ardens, but the spectacle is unbelievable. If you like rain, that is.

    I cannot compare it to other races, as this is the only one I’ve ever been to (in 12 years of being a F1 fan).

    Greets

    Hugo

  12. oddball said on 22nd February 2009, 21:05

    As to those wondering which grandstand to go for – I have been to a double digit number of GPs at Spa and as I have now moved down under and no longer in the running for the tickets I don’t mind telling :-) The by far best seats available on the whole calendar (unless you’re loaded and able to go for the Paddock club) is Spa’s Gold 1. Not only do you see the exit of La Source (1st corner), the exit of the pitlane, the long downhill (where the biggest F1 crash happened right in front my face in ’98) towards and through possibly the best corner on any race track, Eau Rouge but you alse see them through Raidillon and a bit of Kemmel. I can’t think of many other places you can see a car for around 20 seconds per lap – and certainly no place with such entertainment! Oh, and the races at Spa are frequently not just wet, but very wet – and Gold 1 is covered and has two giant TV screens opposite if you need a break from the live action…

    Most years I found it most convenient to camp on a nearby camp-site (the commute from further afield can be quite bad and give you a lot of stress with queuing, finding parking, long walks etc.) and the local sports club had half decent facilities (on the N62 just north of Francorchamps) with only 10-15 minutes walk to the La Source entrance. Wish I could join you…

    • Andy Kelly said on 23rd February 2009, 9:24

      Can you remember the name of the campsite you used near Francorchamps? We stayeed at Stavelot last year & it was quite difficult travelling each day so we want to get closer this year.
      Andy

    • Ed Tucker said on 8th June 2009, 15:54

      Hi, Are you sure you mean Gold 1 as according to my information this is the Pits Grandstand which does not seen to be in accord with your description of the views. Gold 2 (GP2) looks more likely.

    • Ed101 said on 11th May 2011, 18:18

      Hi,

      Interested to know more of your review.

      You mention of Gold 1 however I speculate whether you actually mean Gold 2 unless the seating names have changed. Your description indicates the latter and if what you report is objective then it will certainly be a fantastic vantage point.

      I hope to hear from you particularly as I am planning on Spa later this year.

      Regards

      Ed101

  13. Oddball said on 23rd February 2009, 21:35

    Andy, The campsite I mentioned (like om sure just about all the other ones used by race goers) is not a permanent campsite (I doubt there are much demand for that kind of services the rest of the year) and thus probably don’t have a name per se. However, this particualr one was run one operated by the local football club (they even used the club-house as a bar/cafe) and was only a few hundred meters north of Francorchamps “center” (the N62 /N622 intersection) along the N62. The place is (or at least used to be) very popular so in order to get a space you’e better plan on getting there Thursday evening. Good luck and enjoy!

    • Andy Kelly said on 1st March 2009, 15:55

      Thanks Oddball,
      we arrive Wednesday evening so should be ok for finding somewhere but I really wanted to get something booked in advance, must be getting cautious in my old age!! Think I will try the Elephant (which has a website) & if it’s rubbish I will look for the footie club. Is Frnacorchamps lively during the weekend, we only went in to Stavelot on the Sunday night & it was dead? Mind you, the news that Lewis had been penalised for the Kimi incident had only just got to us so that put a bit of a downer on things & contributed to the atmosphere.
      Andy

  14. We did a 3-week driving tour around Europe for our honeymoon in 2007, taking in a BMW ring-taxi at the Nordschleife and the Spa and Monza Grands Prix. Weather was gorgeous all that Sept, and we boiled in Monza and were sun-bathing in Spa.

    In Spa we were based at the bus-stop chicane (first year it was there) opposite the pit entrance, which led to seeing a lot of people cut the corner and miss the chicane. DC also pulled off and stopped pretty much just in front of us.

    We stayed in Maastricht, which is an easy 40 min drive away, on the Saturday anyway! Sunday had huge traffic jams approaching the circuit and we were stuck for 4 hours, barely making it in time for the warm-up lap. This was unexpected though, as something happened to cause it – even mechanics and pit crew seemed to be stuck in the traffic and scooters were being sent to collect them by the teams!

    Advice if you are driving, leave early in the morning – aim to be there by 9/10 at the latest. There’s a large “pit-village” and plenty of things to amuse you. Parking can be strange – on Sat we were sent up to the fields on the opposite side of the track from our stands and had a long walk down through the trees, coming out at the stands behind Eau Rouge.

    On the Sunday we were a lot later due to the traffic and the police directed us into Francorchamps village. We pulled into a parking lot about 1km from the track and legged it, as traffic was still pretty static. Getting away from the track wasn’t too bad at all – but we didn’t rush.

    If you’re anywhere near the La Source end of the track, get prepared for the track invasion at the end of the race – it’s pretty easy to make it up in time to see the celebrations – we even got a lovely shot of Felipe spitting out his champagne!

    Bus stop was a small, uncovered grandstand, you can see up towards the start line, and the braking zone as the cars approach bus stop – not a massive view of the track, but a decent big screen opposite. Hubbie kept getting distracted however, as Red Bull decided to put their Formula Unas in the row directly behind us!

    We caught no support races on the Sun as we were so late in.

    Overall, it’s a fun track to visit, no tilke-track will ever match up. It’s very central and accessible from most of Western Europe, and good motorway systems approach from all sides. Snack food was reasonable at around a fiver, we drank no beer due to driving. Toilets were free and well maintained for most of the weekend.

    Beware, however – if you try to head into the middle of the track after the race (crossing from Bus-stop to Eau Rouge, there is quite a small tunnel that the large crowd has to pass through. If you’re claustrophobic, avoid this! We got that far and sat down to one side and rested for a while until the crowds lessened. The Belgian police take a dim view of people trying to cross the stream to avoid this, and arrested a few lads as we were watching.

    It was more costly than Monza – Gold/Silver grandstands seem to be more expensive in Spa, we paid almost €1000 for a pair of tickets, if I remember correctly. Staying in Maastricht was a good idea, but leave early!!

  15. Right – 40th Birthday and super wife has brought me and top mate Gold 7 tickets for Spa 2009 for whole 3 days. We went some years back and spent most of it very wet in a field near the pit village in a vague drunken haze – it was the weekend England beat Germany 5-1?. This time we’re looking for the same experience but with our pre-booked access. 1st thoughts are of getting there – Living in south of England seemed simple to get flight to Brussels on Thu pm and back on the Sunday however flight times are not favourable. Plan B is to National Express Coach from London Victoria overnight on the Thursday arriving in Liege early Fri AM allowing us to make 1st free practice in Spa. Getting back is good as coach leaves Liege 21:20 Sun PM giving us time to watch the teams pull out, have a beer and casually make our way back overnight to London.

    Next thoughts are of accommodation. With birthday being this month I jumped straight on the website looking for somewhere with a bed and shower – not a chance!! Now resigned to buying cheap (but waterproof) tent which we could leave behind if it gets wrecked and slumming back in muddy field near the circuit – memory from last visit was that once you’re there it’s best to try and stay put as the traffic’s horrendous and you end up missing the support races.

    Still haven’t found camp site but will keep searching and update later. Some good tips provided by the other contributors to this site. Can’t wait – august seems an age away

    • Paul said on 13th May 2009, 21:04

      Update on progress for anyone interested.

      Struck a bargain. Me and mate getting National Express coach out of Victoria on the Thu at 8:00 pm travelling overnight to arrive in Liege on the Fri at around 7am. Going to jump on train to Spa and get cab to circuit. Have then booked 3 nights camping at the Francorchamps Racing Hotel for 250 Euros – which is right next to the pit entrance – Winner. We leave Sunday night at 9pm local from Liege and arrive back in Victoria about 6am on the Monday. For 2 of us the coach trip cost about £120 return.

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