No tyre trouble but drivers alert to rising temperatures

2013 German Grand Prix Friday practice analysis

Felipe Massa, Ferrari, Nurburgring, 2013The F1 drivers’ threat to boycott the German Grand Prix if the tyre failures seen at Silverstone recur meant today’s two practice session were anxiously watched for any sign of a repeat.

Fortunately there was none. Although we can expect the tyres will come under greater strain as more rubber goes down on the track and temperatures rise, the early signs are F1 is in no danger of a boycott.

Conditions at the track today were cloudy and slightly cool. That is forecast to change tomorrow with higher temperatures expected. So drivers were cautious about reading too much into how the changes to the tyres will affect the competitive order this weekend.

“They are different and require a different set-up, so today was a good opportunity to learn something,” said Nico Rosberg of the revised Pirellis. “We want to understand them quicker and better than the other teams.”

“Generally it seems that we are quick again over one lap and the long run was not bad. It’s difficult to predict where we are, because you never know exactly about the fuel levels of the others. Also it’s going to get warmer on Sunday and this could change also the whole picture again. ”

Mercedes had a second over their rivals in the first session but in second practice Red Bull led the way with less than nine-tenths covering them, Mercedes, Lotus and Ferrari. Sebastian Vettel said: “I wasn?t so happy with the car this morning and Mercedes were quick, but in the afternoon we were in better shape.”

Ferrari were unable to make any progress with Fernando Alonso’s car in the first session due to an electrical problem. It came at an unfortunate time for the team as they try to understand why their cars were off the pace at Silverstone. Pat Fry said they had completed “nowhere near as much” of their programme with Alonso’s car as they intended to.

Lotus were slightly quicker than Ferrari but have decided not to use their Drag Reduction Device for the rest of the weekend.

The second practice session showed that while the medium tyre is very durable, the soft has a very short life. Jenson Button said: “It seems that the idea behind the two compounds is to give us a qualifying tyre that doesn?t last long ?ǣ the [soft] ?ǣ and a race tyre ?ǣ the [medium].”

“It?s not a bad compromise, we just need to deal with the tyre not lasting too long on Sunday.”

According to Pirelli the performance gap between the two compounds is as much as 1.5 seconds.

It was a light day for an unwell Jules Bianchi – Rodolfo Gonzalez drove his car in the first session. “It was already scheduled some time ago that Rodolfo would drive in FP1 and as things turned out that enabled me to rest and hopefully feel better,” said Bianchi.

“This afternoon I completed two runs in FP2 – ten laps in total – but I was not feeling my best, so it was better to stop and properly recuperate. I hope after a good night?s sleep I will be back on form tomorrow.”

Here’s all the data from the first two practice sessions:

Longest stint comparison

This chart shows all the drivers’ lap times (in seconds) during their longest unbroken stint:

http://www.f1fanatic.co.uk/charts/2013drivercolours.csv

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Sebastian Vettel 96.344 96.291 96.922 96.067 96.364 96.381 99.451 96.181 96.295 96.945 96.011
Mark Webber 97.173 97.089 96.695 96.634 97.363 97.682 96.767 96.562 96.451 96.258 96.595 96.376 96.211 97.849 96.321 96.911 96.601 100.041 97.598 96.401 96.17 96.183 96.368
Fernando Alonso 96.542 96.49 97.306 97.171 96.657 101.052 97.029
Felipe Massa 96.217 95.916 96.331 96.633 100.519 97.454 100.778 98.448 99.249
Jenson Button 97.852 98.624 97.816 97.878 99.457 97.863 97.87 98.136 98.883
Sergio Perez 98.515 98.564 98.356 98.09 98.145 98.01 98.498 98.531 100.024 100.548 98.364 98.248 98.95
Kimi Raikkonen 96.359 96.773 97.458 98.513 99.282 104.204 99.356
Romain Grosjean 96.972 96.717 96.57 97.425 98.704 101.035 97.543 98.263
Nico Rosberg 97.575 96.4 96.712 96.998 98.93 96.77 96.942 98.286 96.938 101.642 100.907 97.453 97.393 97.307
Lewis Hamilton 99.494 96.668 92.749 99.887 92.388 92.193 102.728 92.031
Nico Hulkenberg 98.19 98.269 99.882 98.161 98.013 98.012 97.666 97.878 97.784 98.086 98.349 98.045 98.122 98.178 98.193 98.386 98.782 98.843 99.284 99.784 99.199
Esteban Gutierrez 97.419 99.026 99.616 98.659 97.053 97.106 96.991 97.351 96.558 96.928 97.149 97.573 96.877 97.122 99.514 97.002
Paul di Resta 97.342 97.181 98.63 99.044 98.343 101.858 99.123 99.031 99.13 100.087 99.65 99.708 99.845
Adrian Sutil 96.806 96.95 97.709 98.86 99.56 100.255 107.575 100.363
Pastor Maldonado 99.966 99.597 101.695 100.8 101.69 105.125 101.581
Valtteri Bottas 99.891 99.482 99.23 99.316 99.099 100.613 99.466 99.783 101.441 100.975 99.676
Jean-Eric Vergne 98.754 98.642 98.476 98.246 98.442 99.326 98.862 100.244 98.498 98.55
Daniel Ricciardo 98.475 98.134 98.041 98.006 97.909 98.262 98.462 98.727 98.305 98.445 98.032 98.039 97.986
Charles Pic 99.021 99.152 98.535 98.472 98.279 98.722 99.559 99.23 102.428 101.247 100.075 102.662
Giedo van der Garde 100.389 100.173 99.695 99.662 99.617 99.149 98.869 99.025 99.6 98.988 99.11 99.04 98.983 99.049 99.579
Jules Bianchi 97.242 96.544 106.527 95.818
Max Chilton 102.097 100.718 100.392 101.553 100.102 100.515 100.559 101.371 100.976 101.82

Sector times and ultimate lap times – second practice

Pos No. Driver Car S1 S2 S2 Ultimate Gap Deficit to best
1 1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault 29.586 (3) 37.698 (1) 23.080 (1) 1’30.364 0.052
2 2 Mark Webber Red Bull-Renault 29.534 (1) 37.833 (4) 23.284 (4) 1’30.651 0.287 0.032
3 9 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 29.584 (2) 37.865 (6) 23.202 (2) 1’30.651 0.287 0.000
4 8 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 29.667 (5) 37.860 (5) 23.316 (6) 1’30.843 0.479 0.000
5 7 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus-Renault 29.685 (6) 37.798 (3) 23.365 (8) 1’30.848 0.484 0.000
6 4 Felipe Massa Ferrari 29.786 (7) 37.935 (7) 23.265 (3) 1’30.986 0.622 0.073
7 3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 29.955 (10) 37.767 (2) 23.299 (5) 1’31.021 0.657 0.035
8 10 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 29.638 (4) 38.223 (11) 23.381 (9) 1’31.242 0.878 0.062
9 15 Adrian Sutil Force India-Mercedes 29.854 (8) 38.091 (8) 23.427 (10) 1’31.372 1.008 0.452
10 5 Jenson Button McLaren-Mercedes 29.953 (9) 38.174 (10) 23.441 (11) 1’31.568 1.204 0.000
11 14 Paul di Resta Force India-Mercedes 30.005 (11) 38.328 (13) 23.464 (12) 1’31.797 1.433 0.000
12 19 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso-Ferrari 30.253 (15) 38.263 (12) 23.339 (7) 1’31.855 1.491 0.000
13 18 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso-Ferrari 30.180 (14) 38.154 (9) 23.721 (16) 1’32.055 1.691 0.000
14 6 Sergio Perez McLaren-Mercedes 30.030 (12) 38.432 (16) 23.624 (13) 1’32.086 1.722 0.000
15 11 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber-Ferrari 30.260 (16) 38.358 (15) 23.707 (14) 1’32.325 1.961 0.170
16 12 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 30.280 (17) 38.357 (14) 23.875 (19) 1’32.512 2.148 0.250
17 16 Pastor Maldonado Williams-Renault 30.158 (13) 38.772 (17) 23.756 (18) 1’32.686 2.322 0.194
18 17 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Renault 30.298 (18) 38.807 (18) 23.714 (15) 1’32.819 2.455 0.060
19 20 Charles Pic Caterham-Renault 30.663 (19) 39.160 (21) 23.745 (17) 1’33.568 3.204 0.127
20 21 Giedo van der Garde Caterham-Renault 30.715 (20) 39.108 (20) 23.962 (20) 1’33.785 3.421 0.019
21 22 Jules Bianchi Marussia-Cosworth 30.958 (22) 39.090 (19) 23.969 (21) 1’34.017 3.653 0.000
22 23 Max Chilton Marussia-Cosworth 30.850 (21) 39.422 (22) 24.181 (22) 1’34.453 4.089 0.214

Complete practice times

Pos Driver Car FP1 FP2 Total laps
1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault 1’33.213 1’30.416 59
2 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 1’31.973 1’30.651 63
3 Mark Webber Red Bull-Renault 1’32.789 1’30.683 63
4 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 1’33.260 1’30.843 59
5 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus-Renault 1’32.956 1’30.848 49
6 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 1’31.056 41
7 Felipe Massa Ferrari 1’33.065 1’31.059 59
8 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1’31.754 1’31.304 60
9 Jenson Button McLaren 1’33.139 1’31.568 61
10 Paul di Resta Force India-Mercedes 1’33.493 1’31.797 58
11 Adrian Sutil Force India-Mercedes 1’32.822 1’31.824 50
12 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso-Ferrari 1’33.901 1’31.855 65
13 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso-Ferrari 1’33.976 1’32.055 65
14 Sergio Perez McLaren 1’33.456 1’32.086 54
15 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber-Ferrari 1’33.810 1’32.495 59
16 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 1’34.437 1’32.762 68
17 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Renault 1’34.200 1’32.879 57
18 Pastor Maldonado Williams-Renault 1’34.025 1’32.880 56
19 Charles Pic Caterham-Renault 1’35.674 1’33.695 61
20 Giedo van der Garde Caterham-Renault 1’36.078 1’33.804 63
21 Jules Bianchi Marussia-Cosworth 1’34.017 10
22 Max Chilton Marussia-Cosworth 1’35.987 1’34.667 58
23 Rodolfo Gonzalez Marussia-Cosworth 1’37.459 21

Speed trap

# Driver Car Engine Max speed (kph) Gap
1 5 Jenson Button McLaren Mercedes 303.3
2 6 Sergio Perez McLaren Mercedes 303.2 0.1
3 14 Paul di Resta Force India Mercedes 302.4 0.9
4 15 Adrian Sutil Force India Mercedes 302.2 1.1
5 23 Max Chilton Marussia Cosworth 301 2.3
6 18 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso Ferrari 301 2.3
7 9 Nico Rosberg Mercedes Mercedes 300.7 2.6
8 10 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes Mercedes 300.4 2.9
9 16 Pastor Maldonado Williams Renault 300.3 3
10 21 Giedo van der Garde Caterham Renault 300 3.3
11 22 Jules Bianchi Marussia Cosworth 299.9 3.4
12 4 Felipe Massa Ferrari Ferrari 299.7 3.6
13 20 Charles Pic Caterham Renault 299.5 3.8
14 3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari Ferrari 299 4.3
15 17 Valtteri Bottas Williams Renault 298.5 4.8
16 8 Romain Grosjean Lotus Renault 297.1 6.2
17 19 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso Ferrari 296.4 6.9
18 2 Mark Webber Red Bull Renault 296.4 6.9
19 1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull Renault 296.3 7
20 11 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber Ferrari 296.2 7.1
21 12 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber Ferrari 295.4 7.9
22 7 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus Renault 295.2 8.1

2013 German Grand Prix

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Image ?? Ferrari/Ercole Colombo

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25 comments on No tyre trouble but drivers alert to rising temperatures

  1. carbon_fibre (@carbon_fibre) said on 5th July 2013, 18:06

    Did I read correctly? Lotus won’t use DRS for the race?

    • Manished said on 5th July 2013, 18:10

      DRD….not DRS.

      however their top gear setting seems to put themselve on vulnerable position on DRS zone when try to overtake car in front

  2. vickyy (@vickyy) said on 5th July 2013, 18:13

    wow..Hulk seems good in long runs, hard to believe to see that in this year’s Sauber.

  3. Sankalp Sharma (@sankalp88) said on 5th July 2013, 18:16

    RBs’ stints look pretty consistent. Why are the Merc’s so erratic.

  4. caci99 (@caci99) said on 5th July 2013, 18:48

    Looking at the graph, I don’t think the longest stints were all done on the same tire. It would have been useful to have two separate graphs, one for the option and one for the prime tire. Otherwise it is hard to read it as it is.

  5. ME4ME (@me4me) said on 5th July 2013, 19:24

    Very impressive stint by Webber. Wish he’d gone further and see how long the Medium’s really last

  6. kowa said on 5th July 2013, 19:35

    what a bunch of cowards.
    They only say that f1 is dangerous, to make it more appealing to the fans, because when they feel the real danger of a blow up they menace with a boycott.
    What the drivers of the past would think a bout these prima donnas. they would be ashamed. I know i am.

    • Dave (@raceprouk) said on 5th July 2013, 19:42

      So you want to go back to the days of multiple fatalities every season? You’d be the only one.

    • minnis (@minnis) said on 5th July 2013, 20:30

      I take it you’ve never had a tyre blow explode on the motorway then?
      Now consider these drivers doing nearly triple the speed?

      Look at what happened to Massa when a 1kg spring struck his helmet. The total weight of the rubber, metal belts etc are easily more than 1kg.

      These guys are not cowards, they just don’t want to die.

      • Dave (@raceprouk) said on 6th July 2013, 0:47

        I’ve experienced a tyre failure at 50, so I’m able to expand on @minnis assertion you don’t want to experience it. I held on only because the blow was preceded by a major vibration, so I was expecting the failure. Had it been unexpected, I fear I would have inadvertently tested the steel barriers.

    • Shreyas Mohanty (@) said on 5th July 2013, 21:29

      Are you kidding. Try to imagine your car going out of control at 300kph. They are human beings. They have families and loved ones. They don’t want to die. That doesn’t make them cowards. People must be ashamed you live amongst us. I KNOW I AM.

    • xjr15jaaag (@xjr15jaaag) said on 5th July 2013, 22:01

      They are far from cowards; they frequently race cars millimeters away from each other without wanting to back down; that is extremely brave.
      They don’t want to die.
      is that too much to ask?

  7. AdrianMorse (@adrianmorse) said on 5th July 2013, 19:56

    It’s a bit hard to read the long-run performance from the session, but Webber’s medium-tyre run was very impressive. It’s difficult to judge how far away Mercedes are, both on the long runs and on the short, because Hamilton was complaining of choosing a wrong setup direction for FP2, and Rosberg did two longish runs, split over soft and medium compounds.

    I followed the session and got the impression that Mercedes was quite a bit slower than Red Bull over the long run, though. However, this was also the case in Silverstone, and on Sunday there was little to choose between the two teams.

    Strategy is going to be interesting on Sunday. With the soft tyre good for no more than four laps, and perhaps usable for six, it will be interesting to see who uses mediums in Q2 tomorrow. It could be worth a gamble for Alonso, if he doesn’t anticipate doing better than fifth anyway. Equally, perhaps for Red Bull and Mercedes it will be tempting to run mediums and still qualify around P5, though I suspect those two teams will use the softs to fight for pole. Still, if all other teams qualify on the mediums, they can too.

    • HoHum (@hohum) said on 5th July 2013, 23:44

      Surely they would be equally keen to save the mediums for the race and just keep 1 set of options in case there is a similar late race opportunity to change as in silverstone.

  8. Bullfrog (@bullfrog) said on 5th July 2013, 20:03

    Could Marussia have put Speedy back in the car, to get some more laps in, after Bianchi had to stop – or do the rules change after first practice, for substituting drivers?

  9. Tariq Patel (@mdtariqp) said on 5th July 2013, 20:13

    Based on the short life of the soft tyres, I am not sure whether a 2 pit stop strategy will be possible

    • Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 5th July 2013, 21:13

      Medium has a long life! So 2 pit stops definitely possible. 6-7 laps on soft, then 25-27 on medium, then 26-29 on medium. This means doing qualifying on soft only.

    • AdrianMorse (@adrianmorse) said on 5th July 2013, 21:24

      That is interesting indeed. Perhaps a three-stop would be quicker, provided you can run in clean air.

      • Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 5th July 2013, 21:27

        Absolutely, a three stop may well be quicker. But I am certain that it can be done with 2 stops without going ridiculously slow. Webber showed no slow-down after 23 laps, so I think they would have held up for a few more laps. Which means a two-stop is feasible.

        Looking at Di Resta in Canada, he may even be able to do a one-stop!

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