Hamilton edges Alonso as Monza practice begins

2013 Italian Grand Prix first practice

Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes, Monza, 2013Lewis Hamilton was quickest as practice began for the Italian Grand Prix. The Mercedes driver was fractionally faster than Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso.

Alonso was on course to beat Hamilton’s 1’25.565 when he lost time in the final sector and had to settle for second, 0.035s off the Mercedes. Hamilton also came close to beating his own mark but couldn’t repeat his sector three time.

Nico Rosberg underlined Mercedes’ potential with the third-fastest time, followed by Sebastian Vettel.

Lotus brought a longer version of the E21 which Kimi Raikkonen ran and set fifth-fastest time with. Team mate Romain Grosjean in the conventional car was four-tenths of a second slower in 12th.

The McLaren drivers were sixth and seventh ahead of Mark Webber. Early in the session Jenson Button’s DRS remained activated at a part of the circuit where is was supposed to disengage, which the stewards are investigating.

Pastor Maldonado was an encouraging ninth for Williams, despite losing the rear of his car at Ascari, and reported the car was performing better in low-speed corners. Jean-Eric Vergne completed the top ten.

Nico Hulkenberg’s session was interrupted by a gearbox problem. He was able to make it back to the pits but when the team sent him out again the problem recurred and he was pulled back into his box.

In his first F1 practice session appearance James Calado was 17th for Force India, half a second slower than team mate Paul di Resta.

As the session came to an end both Ferrari drivers headed to the end of the pit lane to perform practice starts. Alonso got there in time but the pit exit lights turned red as Felipe Massa arrived and he locked his brakes as he brought the car to a stop. While Alonso performed his practice start, Ferrari mechanics arrived to push him back to the garage.

Pos. No. Driver Car Best lap Gap Laps
1 10 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1’25.565 24
2 3 Fernando Alonso Ferrari 1’25.600 0.035 25
3 9 Nico Rosberg Mercedes 1’25.704 0.139 25
4 1 Sebastian Vettel Red Bull-Renault 1’25.753 0.188 26
5 7 Kimi Raikkonen Lotus-Renault 1’25.941 0.376 22
6 6 Sergio Perez McLaren 1’26.007 0.442 24
7 5 Jenson Button McLaren 1’26.035 0.470 23
8 2 Mark Webber Red Bull-Renault 1’26.103 0.538 27
9 16 Pastor Maldonado Williams-Renault 1’26.149 0.584 21
10 18 Jean-Eric Vergne Toro Rosso-Ferrari 1’26.155 0.590 25
11 12 Esteban Gutierrez Sauber-Ferrari 1’26.194 0.629 25
12 8 Romain Grosjean Lotus-Renault 1’26.295 0.730 23
13 19 Daniel Ricciardo Toro Rosso-Ferrari 1’26.387 0.822 21
14 4 Felipe Massa Ferrari 1’26.449 0.884 16
15 14 Paul di Resta Force India-Mercedes 1’26.594 1.029 13
16 17 Valtteri Bottas Williams-Renault 1’26.802 1.237 21
17 15 James Calado Force India-Mercedes 1’27.041 1.476 24
18 11 Nico Hulkenberg Sauber-Ferrari 1’27.224 1.659 16
19 20 Charles Pic Caterham-Renault 1’27.818 2.253 24
20 23 Max Chilton Marussia-Cosworth 1’27.869 2.304 20
21 21 Heikki Kovalainen Caterham-Renault 1’28.192 2.627 21
22 22 Rodolfo Gonzalez Marussia-Cosworth 1’29.526 3.961 26

2013 Italian Grand Prix

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31 comments on Hamilton edges Alonso as Monza practice begins

  1. MNM101 (@mnm101) said on 6th September 2013, 10:41

    Didn’t hear complaints on the radios, looks to be a competitive weekend

  2. Was Massa just expecting Alonso to do his practice start more quickly? He seemed rushed out of the garage also, like it wasn’t a planned run – merely them spontaneously deciding to do a practice start and as such he had to race to beat the light (hence the burnout from the garage and the lock-up).

    Weird…

  3. Two Mercs in the top 3 – could be very quick in qualifying.

  4. pSynrg (@psynrg) said on 6th September 2013, 10:56

    Impressive session from Calado for a first outing.

    • Jueta (@eljueta) said on 6th September 2013, 11:00

      not so impressive from di resta :P

      • Nick.UK (@) said on 6th September 2013, 11:47

        @eljueta Di Resta has had only a handful of memorable performances. In 80% of races he’s just another car that the race director doesn’t bother to film more than once per race. I don’t get the hype that surrounded him to be honest.

      • di resta only did around half the laps as most other runners so i’m guessing he might have had some sort of problem. Both Force India’s well off the pace though considering top 14 are covered by less than 1 second.

        • Deej92 (@deej92) said on 6th September 2013, 12:17

          I know practice times aren’t entirely representative, but this is a track that usually suits Force India down to the ground, so to struggle here like they did in FP1 is a bit worrying for them.

  5. karter22 (@karter22) said on 6th September 2013, 11:07

    hmmmm, there might be hope for this race! I sure hope ALO held back just a little bit and has some more speed in the bag. Looks promising so far, lets hope it stays that way.

    • WilliamB (@william-brierty) said on 6th September 2013, 11:21

      @karter22 Alonso ran wide at Parabolica on his final lap, which probably cost him a tenth, so yes, Ferrari do look quick. Actually, could Ferrari have actually arrived at a Grand Prix weekend with the out-and-out fastest car for the first time since this race in 2010? I sure hope so, and even if they don’t, all Alonso needs to be is near the top guys, he’ll do the rest.

  6. WilliamB (@william-brierty) said on 6th September 2013, 11:15

    I was hugely impressed with James Calado. To be just four tenths of an experienced, and highly rated teammate on a track that a) he has never driven a car on before, and b) requires time and laps in order to build confidence in the braking zones is an excellent effort. Onboard, he was smooth, progressive and not in anyway erratic, but was equally chasing the throttle through the apexs of the corners. Out of the car he is calm, measured and mature, and has the kind of mature head on young shoulders that would do well in F1, and has done with guys like Rosberg, Vettel and Hulkenberg. For me, it looks very likely that Calado will replace Sutil. Sutil has infrequent flashes of competence, but his career is not going anywhere. Sutil is in no way a bad driver, but he is equally spectacularly unspectacular, and its not like he’s not going to improve as a driver, so why not try this highly impressive young Brit?

  7. medman (@medman) said on 6th September 2013, 15:27

    I think most people (myself included) believed Lewis’ move to Mercedes was questionable, at best. Turns out Mercedes has come on form right on time and McLaren is lost. I really didn’t see this kind of success for Lewis, Nico, or Mercedes this year. Mercedes looks very strong for the future, even though nobody has any real idea who will be on form with the new engines coming on next season. But they have some good people in the positions that matter in the team, and Nico and Lewis form what has to be considered the best driver duo in F1. I’m really hoping to see the Red Bull, or should I say Sebastian Vettel dominance broken. Won’t happen this year I’m afraid, but there is always next season.

    • pSynrg (@psynrg) said on 6th September 2013, 23:29

      If Mercedes aren’t the team pumping stupid amounts of R&D into the 2014 power-train.

      High prestige and a permanent mark in F1 history, to be the team to knock Red-Bull off their perch.

      Is it coincidence that Mercedes have taken a significant step forward when Lewis Hamilton joined the team. Oh and Lewis’ former team suddenly go all mid-field. Is it?

      • Funkyf1 (@funkyf1) said on 7th September 2013, 9:23

        @pSynrg
        No coincidence at all, the amount of personnel that Mercedes recruited last year would bankrupt a small team, they now have some of the best names in the business in every department. That is why Lewis was convinced to move. As for Mclaren being mid-field they have been off the ball for years along with Ferrari. Another reason Lewis chose to leave.

  8. Funkyf1 (@funkyf1) said on 7th September 2013, 9:25

    @pSynrg
    No coincidence at all, the amount of personnel that Mercedes recruited last year would bankrupt a small team, they now have some of the best names in the business in every department. That is why Lewis was convinced to move. As for Mclaren being mid-field they have been off the ball for years along with Ferrari. Another reason Lewis chose to leave.

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