2013 Indian Grand Prix grid

2013 Indian Grand Prix

Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull, Buddh International Circuit, 2013

Row 1 1. Sebastian Vettel 1’24.119
Red Bull
2. Nico Rosberg 1’24.871
Mercedes
Row 2 3. Lewis Hamilton 1’24.941
Mercedes
4. Mark Webber 1’25.047
Red Bull
Row 3 5. Felipe Massa 1’25.201
Ferrari
6. Kimi Raikkonen 1’25.248
Lotus
Row 4 7. Nico Hulkenberg 1’25.334
Sauber
8. Fernando Alonso 1’25.826
Ferrari
Row 5 9. Sergio Perez 1’26.153
McLaren
10. Jenson Button 1’26.487
McLaren
Row 6 11. Daniel Ricciardo 1’25.519
Toro Rosso
12. Paul di Resta 1’25.711
Force India
Row 7 13. Adrian Sutil 1’25.74
Force India
14. Jean-Eric Vergne 1’25.798
Toro Rosso
Row 8 15. Valtteri Bottas 1’26.134
Williams
16. Esteban Gutierrez 1’26.336
Sauber
Row 9 17. Romain Grosjean 1’26.577
Lotus
18. Pastor Maldonado 1’26.842
Williams
Row 10 19. Jules Bianchi 1’26.97
Marussia
20. Giedo van der Garde 1’27.105
Caterham
Row 11 21. Charles Pic 1’27.487
Caterham
22. Max Chilton 1’28.138
Marussia

2013 Indian Grand Prix

Browse all 2013 Indian Grand Prix articles

Advert | Go Ad-free

85 comments on 2013 Indian Grand Prix grid

  1. On pole by just a bit.

  2. Magnificent Geoffrey (@magnificent-geoffrey) said on 26th October 2013, 10:34

    Vettel was so far ahead, he had enough time to do a bit of DIY in Parc Ferme…

  3. Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 26th October 2013, 10:34

    No penalties so far but Hamilton has said on the team radio he was held up by Vettel:

    https://twitter.com/f1fanaticlive/status/394034445210378240

    • Kingshark (@kingshark) said on 26th October 2013, 10:35

      Give him a 21 place grid drop penalty for the sake of excitement. ;-)

    • Peter said on 26th October 2013, 10:37

      Vettel get a penalty! yea right! and finally they talked on bbc about track limits, the last two years vettel has exceeded that track limits on almost every pole lap hes done, rules are rules!

    • David (@neiana) said on 26th October 2013, 10:39

      @keithcollantine I don’t recall seeing him being held up. I do recall seeing him passing a Red Bull that was fairly stationary and offline. Is he just being a baby? I was just about to stop hating him but this is ridiculous.

      There is no way he would have been anywhere near Vettel even if his fast lap had been compromised. I feel like this is a stunt to try and secure a better position by whining.

      • Krichelle (@krichelle) said on 26th October 2013, 10:44

        (@neiana

        Mate, as Rosberg and Hamilton started their second laps, Rosberg went passed a Red Bull on the long back straight, and with live timing, that RB was the last one who went out, which was Vettel. Rosberg wasn’t held up, but Lewis was 2-3 secs behind Rosberg which I also tried to think if he was going to get held up because Vettel was at the hairpin onto turn 5. However, Lewis’ sector times still showed the same in the first sector with Nico. Lewis just said right now, that he was held up in turn 8-9 *second sector*

        • David (@neiana) said on 26th October 2013, 10:47

          @krichelle

          ah, so something off screen, then. I’ll withhold judgment until a ruling comes down. If there is no grid penalty, I will consider Hamilton a whining baby. If there is, I will just ignore him like usual. :)

    • Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 26th October 2013, 10:47

      I just checked timings by sector and on his last fast lap, Hamilton overtook Vettel, who was on his last outlap, in sector 3. This is where he could have been impeded. But frankly, Hamilton’s time was still pretty good, so the impeding can’t have been much.

  4. Krichelle (@krichelle) said on 26th October 2013, 10:36

    This will be interesting, RB decided to split their strategies again. I want another Red Bull showdown before the season ends to spic things up!!!

  5. Kingshark (@kingshark) said on 26th October 2013, 10:37

    Why did Alonso not do a run on the softs in the final part of Q3? He was only 0.3 seconds slower than Seb in Q2, and even if he had merely replicated his time of 1:24.8, he would have been on the front row.

    • magon4 (@magon4) said on 26th October 2013, 10:41

      He wanted the different strategy. That’s why.

      • Kingshark (@kingshark) said on 26th October 2013, 10:44

        @magon4
        Perhaps, but I don’t think it will work. He will get stuck behind slower cars in the first stint. Ferrari should’ve followed Mercedes.

        All this on a Saturday where Ferrari actually looked reasonably competitive compared to all the other teams (bar Red Bull).

        • magon4 (@magon4) said on 26th October 2013, 10:47

          It is true they looked to be up to facing Mercedes on pace. But if he gets a good start he just can sit in there and go much longer, having the overtaking power in the last stint.

        • Steph (@stephanief1990) said on 26th October 2013, 11:14

          @Kingshark who knows how it will play out? Alonso usually gets good starts, those on softs will have to pit fairly early anyway which will move him up if he is stuck behind anyone and when he has to put the softs on they’ll last a bit longer than those who qualified on them. The Ferrari is too slow and Seb always manages to up his game whenever the pressure is on in qualifying – being a bit behind in Q2 doesn’t mean much when Seb always pulls it out of the bag in Q3 to blow everyone away and he has been in another world this weekend. Ferrari took a gamble to try something different because just trying to keep up with Seb isn’t really getting them anywhere.

      • Kingshark (@kingshark) said on 26th October 2013, 10:44

        @magon4
        Perhaps, but I don’t think it will work. He will get stuck behind slower cars in the first stint. Ferrari should’ve followed Mercedes.

        All this on a Saturday where Ferrari actually looked reasonably competitive compared to all the other teams (bar Red Bull).

  6. toiago (@toiago) said on 26th October 2013, 10:39

    No surprises really, apart from Grosjean. And could someone explain to me how significant it is to start with the medium tyres? Because I can’t see a big advantage coming from it.

    • iAltair (@ialtair) said on 26th October 2013, 10:39

      Just to last longer for the first stint.

    • David (@neiana) said on 26th October 2013, 10:40

      @toiago if you’re at the front of the grid with medium tires, you force those behind you on soft tires to waste their tires trying to get around you. In the end, you’d get to run the soft tires later in the race while you’re essentially at the same place on track as they are, thus giving you the advantage.

      Unless you’re Webber, in which case you can’t pass a slower car with several laps older and slower tires.

      • Patrick (@paeschli) said on 26th October 2013, 10:42

        + the softer tyre will last longer in a car who has less fuel, so running an option tyre at the end of the race is better

        • toiago (@toiago) said on 26th October 2013, 10:49

          Not always, as Alonso experienced in last year’s British GP. I know some of the benefits of doing this “reversed” strategy, but I have my doubts also because of the fact that, if it was so critical, why Vettel wouldn’t use it as well? Such is his advantage over the rest of the field in either compound.

          • David (@neiana) said on 26th October 2013, 10:52

            The biggest problem is the lead contender in this particular strategy is Webber. The Webber who couldn’t pass Grosjean two weeks ago. Grosjean who had older primes and Webber had options (if I recall correctly?). So giving Webber this particular strategy is pretty much saying “here’s a second chance.”

          • pastaman (@pastaman) said on 26th October 2013, 19:24

            Because if he starts first (which is a good bet), he will have clean air to pull ahead enough and render moot the opposite strategy.

    • Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 26th October 2013, 10:40

      softs go off after 5-10 laps so when you pit you come out in the middle of the traffic of slower cars on old mediums.

    • @toiago if you start on the mediums, you can run for perhaps half the race from the start. That means you will maintain track position, whereas the soft runners will have to pit early and lose track position. So the top 3 will likely have to overtake the medium runners – quite tricky as they don’t drop off all that much it appears.

      • TMF (@tmf42) said on 26th October 2013, 10:51

        @vettel1 – I wouldn’t bet on in that the medium lasts that much longer. On high fuel load they tend to grain faster and the softs won’t be that bad tomorrow, considering how much the track evolved since yesterday. But we’ll see , the split of strategies definitely spices it up.

        • toiago (@toiago) said on 26th October 2013, 11:59

          Exactly, in some previous races we’ve seen the mediums last for more or less 10 laps in some cars. That’s why I don’t see a great advantage in running them for the first two stints, and then the softs on the last one.

  7. Patrick (@paeschli) said on 26th October 2013, 10:40

    Webber is the main challenger for the win tomorrow :O

    I wonder if Vettel could have had pole position with the prime tyres …

  8. subbf1 (@subbu) said on 26th October 2013, 10:41

    Any Idea why Lotus sent Kimi out so early ? He came into the pits when others were still starting their final laps.

  9. zimkazimka (@zimkazimka) said on 26th October 2013, 10:42

    wow, Bianchi almost caught that Williams. impressive.

  10. magon4 (@magon4) said on 26th October 2013, 10:42

    Kimi’s performance was pretty poor.

  11. magon4 (@magon4) said on 26th October 2013, 10:43

    Alonso will make podium tomorrow, behind the Bulls.

  12. zimkazimka (@zimkazimka) said on 26th October 2013, 10:46

    poor Romain. at this point i think he’s about the only one who can play with the Bulls. let’s see what he can do in the race.

  13. Having just watched the full on board of Vettel’s lap, I just recalled a comment from Hamilton last year saying Vettel could miss a few apexes and still get pole.

    Lewis, watch that lap.

  14. Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 26th October 2013, 10:49

    Vettel will lose his record of leading all laps in India.

    • iAltair (@ialtair) said on 26th October 2013, 10:50

      Hard to say. 2013 was just as close as 2011 and 2012.

      • Mike Dee (@mike-dee) said on 26th October 2013, 10:57

        I doubt he can pull a 20-odd-second gap on his first stint on Webber.

        • David (@neiana) said on 26th October 2013, 11:02

          @mike-dee I have a sneaking feeling Alonso will be ahead of Webber by the time Vettel pits but I still agree with your assessment. If Vettel takes care of his tires to stretch them, he can’t get the gap. If he tries to pull out the gap, he’ll have to pit earlier. Either way I seriously doubt he’ll keep that record.

        • Todfod (@todfod) said on 26th October 2013, 11:33

          Its not that hard actually.
          Say the options are a second a lap quicker than the primes, and they last for 10 laps -> That’s 10 seconds just because of being on a quicker tyre.

          Vettel will also have the benefit of being in clear air as compared to Webber, which should also account for 6 tenths of a lap -> say another 6 secs

          Plus Webber will probably lose a position or two, so I think it should be possible for Vettel to still lead every lap of the race tomorrow

  15. ME4ME (@me4me) said on 26th October 2013, 10:56

    I had Vettel with a 1.24.122 in the prediction championship… so close! :D
    Strategi should be interesting tomorrow. Guessing the podium will be VET-WEB-ALO.

Add your comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

All comments must abide by the comment policy. Comments may be moderated.
Want to post off-topic? Head to the forum.
See the FAQ for more information.