Jean Todt’s Approval Rating V

Are you happy with how F1 is being run by the FIA president?

Once every month at F1 Fanatic we look at how the president of the sport?s governing body, Jean Todt, is managing the championship.

Join in by casting your vote below.

FIA developments since the last approval rating

Sidepod mirrors banned

The FIA outlawed sidepod-mounted wing mirrors, originally giving teams until the Chinese Grand Prix to get rid of them, then extended the deadline to the Spanish round.

More recently is was announced that F-Ducts will be banned in 2011, but the decision to do this was taken jointly by the teams.

Read more: Sidepod mirrors banned from next race

Briatore and Symonds settlement

The FIA had declared its intention to protest the Tribune de Grande Instance’s January verdict striking out the FIA’s bands on Flavio Briatore and Pat Symonds over the 2008 Singapore controversy.

Last month the FIA announced it had reached a deal with the pair which will see them prohibited from working in F1 until 2013.

Read more: Briatore and Symonds accept three-year F1 ban in Singapore crash settlement

Women in motor racing

Todt has begun putting one of his election promises into practice by setting up a commission with the target of increasing the participation of women in motor sport.

Read more: FIA wants more women in motor racing

2011 tyre supplier

A decision remains to be taken on who will supply tyres to the F1 teams in 2011.

However it seems the sticking point at present is the teams’ inability to choose a preferred supplier. Michelin and Pirelli are said to be the favourites. Will the FIA step in and make the decision for them?

2011 teams

Applications remain open for a 13th team to enter F1 in 2011. Among the teams believed to be planning applications are Epsilon Euskadi and ART – the latter run by Todt’s son Nicolas.

Two former applicants have confirmed they will not be making a bid this time:

Splitting qualifying in Monaco

There was pressure from some teams and drivers to change the format of qualifying for the Monaco Grand Prix to ensure the front-running cars would not be impeded by the slowest runner.

The FIA’s Charlie Whiting said he would consider a proposed alternative arrangement for qualifying if the teams could agree on one. They did not, qualifying went ahead as usual, but there were no significant problems for any of the teams in Q1.

Read more: Should Monaco qualifying be split? (Poll)

Stewarding and rules clarification

The role of stewards in F1 races has come under fresh scrutiny following the decisions on Lewis Hamilton weaving to keep Vitaly Petrov behind in Sepang, Hamilton’s clash with Sebastian Vettel in the pits at Shanghai, and Michael Schumacher’s post-race penalty at Monaco.

The FIA reacted to the latter yesterday by conceding its rules were unclear and promising to change them.

Read more: FIA admits ??lack of clarity?? and vows to change rules after Monaco controversy

Jean Todt’s Approval Rating

As an F1 fan, do you approve or disapprove of the way Jean Todt is handling his job as President?

  • Approve (78%)
  • Disapprove (8%)
  • No opinion (14%)

Total Voters: 1,103

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Jean Todt?s Approval Rating so far

Date Approve Disapprove No opinion
April 2010 63% 14% 23%
March 2010 53% 24% 23%
February 2010 57% 14% 29%
January 2010 55% 16% 29%

Jean Todt’s Approval Rating

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50 comments on Jean Todt’s Approval Rating V

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  1. GeeMac said on 21st May 2010, 13:09

    No Opinion from me this time round (after two approvals. I like the ban of outboard mirrors, and the decision not to split Monaco quali. But somehow he hasn’t done enough to get my approval or disapproval, he is just doing his job, which is a good thing I guess.

  2. sumedh said on 21st May 2010, 13:31

    I have changed from approval to no opinion this time.

    The plus points were not splitting the qualifying.

    But the Schumacher penalty and continued delay of fixing the tyre supplier count against FIA.

    • Sideshow bob said on 21st May 2010, 17:24

      He’s light-years ahead of Mosley. For that I give him approval.

      • Hallard said on 21st May 2010, 17:55

        That is my reason for approval as well. Shockingly different from Mosley. I certainly didnt think it would be like this.

        • leon said on 21st May 2010, 22:45

          I believe Todt is doing very well. His touch is sure, he keeps a low profile
          ( except when it comes to making the right dcisions about being photographed with the pantheon of great F1 Champions). Otherwise, Todt is politically astute and hasn’t put a foot wrong. Yet.

          And of course everyone forgets now that at this stage in his career as FIA president, and for long years afterwards, Mosley could do no wrong. After the very bad years under Balestre, Mosley was seen as a superb new broom who, in partnership with Ecclestone, was sweeping all the corruption and double dealing away and gradually creating the F1 we know today.

          Who was it said that, eventually, all political careers end in failure ?

          It would be good to think that Todt will change all that and carry respect and success into retirement, wouldn’t it ?

  3. Arun Srini said on 21st May 2010, 13:32

    Atleast one of my hunches, that Todt would do more good for F1 than his predecessor, is coming along well.

    • Jim N said on 21st May 2010, 13:55

      That tends to be the case, at least at the beginning. Max was better than Jean-Marie Balestre, and in turn he was better than Paul Metternich, I can’t remember back further than that. The issue is if he will be as good in 5 or 10 years time when megalomania will have had time to develop.

      • Javaguy said on 22nd May 2010, 14:43

        Hasn’t he announced he’ll only be staying for one term? Plenty of time for him to change his mind though, granted.

  4. It has become clear since Mosley was out and Todt in that the less is heard in public from the FIA President on individual motorsport series, the better.

    For example, if Mosely was still in power we would no doubt have heard of half a dozen interivews with him discussing, arguing, justifying the stewards decision at Monaco (and else where). From previous experience, this just adds fuel to the fire. In some quarters, fans are disappointed by the stewarding though I think in all it has been good, fair and not detrimental to racing.

    Surprisingly Formula 1 comissioner job is still up for grabs. At this point in time, where there is some discussion about changes to the sporting regulations following LastLapSafetyCar-gate, the FIA does need a figurehead who will stand up to media scrutiny. This person should not be the FIA President, and I hope not Max Mosely either!

  5. Mike said on 21st May 2010, 14:07

    I went approve, although not everything has been perfect, the recent maturity about the rules has impressed me, Somehow I can’t imagine Mosley doing the same…

  6. Ned Flanders said on 21st May 2010, 14:29

    Hmm his approval seems to have gone up quite a lot this month. I thought it might have gone down after Rule 40.13-gate, although I suppose that was more a legacy of the ambiguous rules of the Mosley regime

    • HounslowBusGarage said on 21st May 2010, 15:26

      I think it went up *because* of Rule 40.13 Gate. Or rather, it went up because of the absence of vitriol, retribution and threats of being cast into outer darkness that we were used to from his predecessor.
      All of a sudden, the FIA looked more reasonable.

      • I agree. The promise to sort out the confusion probably raised his esteem in some people’s eyes – including mine.

        Wow, who woulda thunk it? This is the 4th approval in a row from me for Todt :p

    • Bigbadderboom said on 21st May 2010, 17:05

      I think the dealing of the Schuey Rule 40.13 was swift and fair, and the FIA agree to review its lack of clarity. You can only approve of such action. The FIA seem to be working for motorsport now as oppossed to motorsport delivering for the FIA under the previous regime. Jean Todt “APPROVED”

  7. Bartholomew said on 21st May 2010, 14:52

    My main objection to Todt is that he does not create enough trouble to keep us entertained between races

  8. rampante said on 21st May 2010, 14:54

    He has done no wrong and has tried to correct errors in the rules and system. This is what an FIA president should be doing.

  9. George said on 21st May 2010, 15:11

    He has kept my approval, the tire situation has me worried though.

  10. Vincent said on 21st May 2010, 15:31

    He’s doing quite well, however not using the option the FIA has to reverse the Monaco penalty even after admitting the rules weren’t clear is beyond me, so I voted no opinion.

  11. JoeE said on 21st May 2010, 15:44

    Cant fault him atm, hes doing abtter job the Mad Max and keeping low key while doing whats needed to keep F1 and other motorsport alive.

  12. Untitled258 said on 21st May 2010, 15:58

    Approve.

    FIA Presidents should be seen and not heard.

    Todt is good at that.

  13. James said on 21st May 2010, 16:05

    Very disappointed in this vote as a result of how Monaco was handled. Schumacher should not have recieved such a harsh punihsment. He should have recieved a penalty which in seconds which would have demoted him to 7th – not that I believe one should have been imposed in the first place.

    • Rob said on 21st May 2010, 16:39

      I think it is unfair to hold this against him – the option is not currently in the rules to tailor a punishment ‘to fit the crime’ and I would much rather have someone who follows the rules as they are written instead of trying to show how powerful he is by changing rules everytime something happens that he doesn’t like.

      I can’t believe Jean was satisfied with the punishment given to Schumacher, but intervening would have done more harm than good, and called his impartiality in to question to boot.

      • Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine) said on 21st May 2010, 16:47

        intervening would have done more harm than good, and called his impartiality in to question to boot.

        Exactly.

      • Vincent said on 21st May 2010, 18:09

        The option is currently in the rules to make the punishment fit the crime. Try reading the International Sporting Code. Articles 152 and 153.

    • Spud said on 21st May 2010, 17:09

      He was punished under the only rules that were there at the time.

      They can’t just make up rules every time a rare occurence like Monaco, Spa etc., happens.

      It sucks that it has to happen but rules are rules. The are to be clarified so nothing more can be said.

      I approve of the FIA for sticking to they’re guns on this one.

  14. wasiF1 said on 21st May 2010, 16:27

    So far so good but there should have been more work on Schumacher’s pass on Alonson in Monaco they should have just swap places as the rule book itself weren’t clear.

  15. Rob said on 21st May 2010, 16:45

    I voted approve because he has kept to his role, handled things sensibly and proved that so far he is impartial. I am slightly concerned that he has not made many moves in the area of reforming aerodynamics regulations, which is my single biggest concern about the racing at the moment.

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